Friday

30th Sep 2016

Greek PM to ask for softer bailout terms

Greek Prime Minister Antonis Samaras is next week meeting top EU leaders in a bid to negotiate a two-year deadline extension of the current bailout terms due to the worsening recession.

But patience among eurozone donors is wearing thin.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

  • Drachma banknote - the risk of a greek euro exit is being openly talked about as patience wears thin (Photo: Tonton Bernardo)

Samaras is due to receive Eurogroup chief Jean-Claude Juncker in Athens on 22 August, after which he will travel to Berlin and Paris to meet Chancellor Angela Merkel and President Francois Hollande to lay out why Greece needs two more years to meet the agreed terms, Greek daily Ekathimerini reports.

According to internal documents obtained by the Financial Times, the €11.5 billion worth of spending cuts the government is still struggling to cobble together would be spread over four years until 2016, instead of the 2014 deadline that is currently expected by Greece's lenders.

In order for the plan to work, Greece would need an extra €20 billion to support the budget as the annual deficit reduction in 2013-2014 would be smaller than planned.

But Athens would not seek extra money on top of the €130 billion bailout agreed in March, FT reports, and instead would ask for its repayment of the first bailout it received in 2014 to be postponed until 2020.

In support of his plea, Samaras is likely to invoke the worsening recession - 6.2 percent of GDP according to the latest Eurostat figures published on Tuesday - and its record unemployment rate of over 23 percent.

"The deficit reduction demanded for the period 2013-2014 is excessive. An overdose of austerity is self-defeating," said Iannis Mourmouras, the prime minister's chief economic adviser, according to the FT.

But whether his case will be heard in the German chancellery is doubtful, as leading coalition politicians in recent weeks have floated the idea of a "manageable" Greek euro-exit, a scenario even Jean-Claude Juncker confirmed.

The Greek government is struggling to get by on the first tranche of the €130 billion bailout agreed in March, as the second one is pending a troika report and has been delayed amid political turmoil in Athens and two successive elections.

On Tuesday, it managed to raise a record of €4 billion from its banks - also propped with bailout money - so that it can repay the European Central Bank (ECB) a €3.2 billion debt in bonds maturing on 20 August.

The fact that the ECB refused to extend the deadline on the debt repayment is also an indicator that patience among Greece's creditors is running out.

New EU rules on financial products in limbo

A feud between MEPs and the EU commission is threatening to derail financial services regulation that would protect consumers from misleading investment products.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceWhy the Investment Plan for Europe Does not Drive the Sustainable Energy Transition
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region Seeks to Make Its Voice Heard in the World
  3. Taipei EU OfficeCountries Voice Support for Taiwan's Participation in ICAO
  4. World VisionNew Tool Measuring Government Efforts to Protect Children Released
  5. GoogleDid You Know Europe's Largest Dinosaur Gallery Is in Brussels? Check It Out Now
  6. IPHRHuman Rights in Uzbekistan After Karimov - Joint Statement
  7. CISPECloud Infrastructure Providers Unveil Data Protection Code of Conduct
  8. EFAMessages of Hope From the Basque Country and Galicia
  9. Access NowDigital Rights Heroes and Villains. See Who Protects Your Rights, Who Wants to Take Them Away
  10. EJCAppalled by Recommendation to Remove Hamas From EU Terrorism Watch List
  11. GoogleBringing Education to Refugees in Lebanon With the Clooney Foundation for Justice
  12. Belgrade Security ForumCan Democracy Survive Global Disorder?