Monday

20th Feb 2017

Focus

University quotas on foreign students may be allowed, says EU court

  • The onus is on the national authorities to prove that restrictive measures are necessary (Photo: James Almond)

The European Court of Justice has indicated that member states can impose quotas on the number of EU students coming from other countries under certain strict conditions.

In a ruling on Tuesday (13 April), the court said that while discrimination against students on the basis of nationality contravenes EU law, it may be allowed if it ultimately protects public health.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

It "may be justified by the objective of maintaining a balanced high quality medical service open to all, in so far as it contributes to achieving a high level of protection of health," said the court in a statement.

The ruling was in response to a case before the Belgian national court challenging a 2006 decree limiting the number of non-resident students studying certain physiotherapy and veterinary degrees to 30 percent in Wallonia, the French-speaking part of Belgium.

The quota was put in place after the Belgian authorities argued that public health was endangered as there were not enough Belgian graduates in the area. Before the 2006 quota came into place, around 75 percent of the students in such courses were non-resident in Belgium. They mostly came from France.

The Belgian court referred the case to the European Court of Justice for interpretation of EU law. In response, the Luxembourg-based court said the quota could only be maintained if the national authorities using "objective, detailed analysis, supported by figures," prove there are "genuine risks" to public health.

Then the Belgian court has to assess, in light of the evidence given by the national authorities, if the quota in place is appropriate. It must also examine whether the safety of public health could not be ensured by less restrictive measures, such as encouraging foreign students to settle in Belgium after their studies.

The ruling is likely to be carefully studied by other member states facing similar problems. Austria, which has many German students in its medical courses, has also imposed a quota.

Under the Austrian decree, 75 percent of the places for medicine are for students with a certificate from Austrian schools, while 20 percent of places are reserved for students from other EU countries, and five percent for non-EU students.

Austrian newspaper Der Standard notes that Tuesday's ruling suggests that Austria's decree is also not likely to fall foul of EU law on discrimination grounds.

EU interns to rebel against unpaid work

Young people will gather in Brussels on Monday to protest against hundreds of unpaid traineeships offered by the EU institutions each year.

Data hole in EU plan for youth jobs

EU commission wants to spend another €2 billion on creating jobs for young people, but lack of data on who gets what from the scheme poses questions.

University rankings reveal two-speed Europe

British, German and Dutch institutions do very well in the latest university rankings, with Oxford named the world's best. But the French and much of the rest of the EU are lagging behind.

Opinion

The 89ers and the battle against populism

It falls to the Europeans who were born around 1989 and grew up in a peaceful Europe to build a fresh new vision for the EU that transcends the ideological, educational and national cleavages of the past.

In cooperation with

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Malta EU 2017End of Roaming Fees: Council Reaches Agreement on Wholesale Caps
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Help Startups Access US Market
  3. Centre Maurits CoppietersMinorities and Migrations
  4. Salzburg Global SeminarThe Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play
  5. UNICEFNumber of Ukrainian Children Needing Aid Nearly Doubles to 1 Million Over the Past Year
  6. Centre Maurits CoppietersThe Situation of Refugee Women in Europe
  7. Salzburg Global SeminarToward a Shared Culture of Health: Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship
  8. European Free AllianceAustria Should Preserve & Promote Bilingual and Multinational Carinthia
  9. Martens CentreShow Your Love for Democracy! Take Part in Our Contest: "If It's Broken, Let's Fix It"
  10. CISPECloud Computing Leaders Establish Data Protection Standards to Protect Customer Data
  11. Malta EU 2017Landmark Deal Reached With European Parliament on Portability of Online Content
  12. Belgrade Security ForumBSF 2017: Building a Common Future in the Age of Uncertainty