Saturday

29th Apr 2017

EU wants energy labels for televisions

The European Commission proposed on Tuesday (28 September) that after refrigerators, dishwashers and washing machines, televisions will also have to be marked with a label indicating how much energy they consume.

If approved by member states and the European Parliament, it will be the first time ever that television manufacturers will have to declare the energy efficiency of their products, using an-A to-G scale.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The label will have to be clearly shown on the TV set and in advertisements, if the price of TV is mentioned. The obligation is supposed to lead to more energy savings and CO2 emissions cuts.

"Energy labels move the market towards highly energy efficient products which is a major contribution to reaching Europe's energy efficiency, competitiveness and climate change goals. At the same time, they save money for consumers," energy commissioner Gunther Oettinger said in a statement.

According to the commission's estimates, an "A class" television compared to an average one from class D can result in €35 of saving in energy costs a year. "A product which saves energy is slightly more expensive when you buy it but in the long run you save money," a commission spokesperson said.

Further changes are also planned for refrigerators, dishwashers and washing machines, which have been labelled since 1992, as around 90 percent of appliances sold in the EU today fit in the best existing class compared to two percent 18 years ago.

The EU wants to extend the A to G scale upwards with three new classes: "A+" "A++" and "A+++" for products with a better than A performance, changing the current green colour of class A to yellow.

Class A products should consume half of the electricity of class C ones and 65 percent of class D products. Each category above the A class should consume 30 percent less electricity. Currently there are no TV sets deserving better than an A mark.

An EU official, who described the labels as a "powerful tool" for market transparency, but also for companies and their marketing activities, said the new system could also be a strong motivator for businesses to innovate and introduce new products.

There are already some A+++ appliances that have not yet been introduced on the market because they were not allowed to be labelled according to their energy consumption, said the official.

Although the Commission has promised the labelling scheme will not increase prices, the official said that if the prices of top class products go up it could take around five years until the competition is able to introduce comparable products which could push prices down again.

If member states and the parliament do not object to the proposal, it should enter into force by February at the latest. Producers will be allowed to use the labels on a voluntary basis immediately after the entry into force of the regulation, their use will be mandatory on all appliances one year after entry into force of the rules.

US prevents G7 energy statement

The United States did not sign a joint statement at a G7 summit on energy because it did not want to include a reference to the Paris climate agreement.

EU doing well in global energy ranking

The majority of countries in the top-20 of the Global Energy Architecture Performance Index are members of the European Union, with Switzerland leading the list.

News in Brief

  1. Vote of no confidence prepared against Spanish PM
  2. Syria to buy Russian anti-missile system
  3. Germany seeks partial burka ban
  4. Libya has no plan to stop migration flows
  5. EU has no evidence of NGO-smuggler collusion in Libya
  6. Poland gets 'final warning' on logging in ancient forest
  7. Commission gives Italy final warning on air pollution
  8. Romania and Slovenia taken to court over environment policies

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceCharlotte Hornets' Nicolas Batum Tells Kids to "Eat Well, Drink Well, Move!"
  2. ECR GroupSyed Kamall: We Need a New, More Honest Relationship With Turkey
  3. Counter BalanceParliament Sends Strong Signal to the EIB: Time to Act on Climate Change
  4. ACCARisks and Opportunities of Blockchain and Shared Ledgers Technologies in Financial Services
  5. UNICEFRace Against Time to Save Millions of Lives in Yemen
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersDeveloping Independent Russian-Language Media in the Baltic Countries
  7. Swedish EnterprisesReform of the European Electricity Market: Lessons from the Nordics, Brussels 2 May
  8. Malta EU 2017Green Light Given for New EU Regulation to Bolster External Border Checks
  9. Counter BalanceCall for EU Commission to Withdraw Support of Trans-Adriatic Pipeline
  10. ACCAEconomic Confidence at Highest Since 2015
  11. European Federation of Allergy and Airways60%-90% of Your Life Is Spent Indoors. How Does Poor Indoor Air Quality Affect You?
  12. European Gaming and Betting AssociationCJEU Confirms Obligation for a Transparent Licensing Process

Latest News

  1. EP chief faces questions after homophobic 'summit'
  2. EU signals Northern Ireland could join if united with Ireland
  3. One year later: EU right to open Internet still virtual
  4. Rethinking Europe's relationship with Turkey
  5. Mob storms Macedonian parliament
  6. MEPs retain secrecy on office spending
  7. May accuses EU-27 of 'lining up against Britain'
  8. Resurrected Renzi to regain leadership of Italy's ruling party