Tuesday

16th Aug 2022

Germany to EU: stop talking about new budget schemes

  • A special budget would not solve the euro-crisis, says German official (Photo: PeterXIII)

German officials are in eye-rolling mode ahead of an EU summit about plans to create a eurozone "shock absorption fund" and say leaders should focus on reforms and stick to their promises.

"I am honestly a little surprised that everyone is just talking about how to spend money, but not about what matters: to increase competitiveness and employment," a senior German official told journalists in Berlin on Wednesday (12 December).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

A eurozone-only budget "would not solve the crisis, nor its root problems," the source added.

The idea of a "shock absorption fund" to offset the negative impact of economic crises for countries in the euro-area who cannot devalue their currencies was tabled by EU council chief Herman Van Rompuy in his latest proposals for the future of the eurozone.

But the German government is insisting that first more controls on national budgets need to be in place, in what Van Rompuy dubbed "contractual agreements" signed by member states.

Here too, there is no final concept yet on how these agreements would be implemented, at what stage stronger supervision would kick in and who would be the arbiter - the European Court of Justice being one option.

"About this fiscal capacity, it would be wrong to try and undermine one part what we are trying to establish on the other - more economic coordination and fiscal supervision. So there is no point now to think about anti-cyclical giant capacities," the official said.

Instead of trying to create new funding schemes that pose legal challenges, the existing EU budget should be better used and the pace of structural reforms kept, the official said.

However, back in June when EU leaders first floated the idea of a eurozone budget, Germany was more favourable of various forms of "solidarity" with the crisis-plagued countries in the eurozone.

The pressure has been lifted since, because the European Central Bank in August announced it would purchase "unlimited" amounts of government bonds from countries under market pressure, if they sign up to reforms plans.

Borrowing costs dropped and the pressure on EU leaders to agree on anything this week has virtually disappeared.

Even the German government, once a proponent of revamping euro-architecture, including via treaty change, is now admitting the time is not ripe for such discussions.

"We need to see how full the agenda since August was - banking union, EU multi-annual budget, efforts related to Greece. So perhaps it is human that the question of the mid-term future of the eurozone is not being now dealt with the intensity and the focus we would have liked," the official said.

A change to the EU treaties is "not off the table" but first leaders have to agree on the "content" of the changes and only later on the legal instruments to do so, the source explained. That process will take another "four to six months."

Eurozone needs a 'shock absorption' fund

A eurozone-wide 'shock absorption' fund should be created to assist countries in economic difficulty, according to a paper that will take centre stage at next week's EU summit.

Agenda

Minimal changes to euro structure at this WEEK's summit

EU leaders gathering for their sixth summit this year are likely to fudge plans for more integration in the eurozone that were originally aimed at calming market fears about the survival of the euro.

Leaders disagree on future euro integration

EU leaders early Friday had different views on how to deepen integration in the eurozone, with Germany keen to limit a new budget for reforms to €20 billion.

'Disappointment' for those expecting ambitious EU summit

EU leaders will gather in Brussels Thursday and Friday but as market pressure has waned so too have member states' ambitions. Draft summit conclusions have been re-written to reflect the reduction in reform zeal.

Brazil pitches itself as answer to Ukraine war food shortages

Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro is pitching his Latin American country as the answer to the world food crisis following the war in Ukraine. The traditional wheat importer has now exported three million tonnes of the grain so far in 2022.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  3. European Centre for Press and Media FreedomEuropean Anti-SLAPP Conference 2022
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  6. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting

Latest News

  1. Germany rejects visa ban for Russian tourists
  2. Iran responds to EU's 'final text' on nuclear deal
  3. Model minority myths
  4. EU must make public who really owns its fishing fleets
  5. Germany needs to cut gas use by 20% to stave off winter crisis
  6. Europe's wildfire destruction set to hit new record
  7. How Putin and Erdoğan are making the West irrelevant
  8. Defying Russian bombs, Ukraine football starts 2022 season

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us