Sunday

29th Mar 2020

Liberal MEP tables 'Plan B' for EU constitution

  • climate change: Mr Duff wants to put issues that concern Europeans into a new constitution (Photo: Wikipedia)

Over one year after the constitution was rejected in two referendums, ideas and plans are slowly emerging on how to revive the document with one influential MEP suggesting a new-look version should include articles on issues like climate change which are of direct concern to EU citizens.

UK liberal MEP Andrew Duff will on Wednesday (18 October) present his "Plan B: how to rescue the European Constitution" amid a re-emerging debate across Europe on the fate of the charter after French and Dutch voters rejected it in 2005.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or join as a group

"We are now at two years on since the signing of the constitution," he told EUobserver. "It is about time we pressed on with Plan B."

In the rescue plan, the MEP staunchly defends the core of the existing EU constitution text – part I on institutional reform and part II on fundamental rights - while making the document more attractive to citizens by adding provisions which specifically address their concerns.

"We have to try to understand the causes of the disaffection which was expressed in France and the Netherlands and elsewhere," he said.

"I think if one does, and I have, there are five elements which stand out," he argued referring to the economic governance of the union; Europe's social model; sustainable development and climate change policy; enlargement policy; and the reform of the EU's finances.

The Duff plan proposes adding fresh clauses on these five policy areas to the constitution by opening up the current policy part of the text, part III, while leaving parts I and II as they are.

Sarkozy and Amato

The MEP insists that simply removing the entire or most of part III – as proposed by French interior minister Nicolas Sarkozy and others - is not enough. "Subediting is not a sufficient response to the crisis," he said explaining that the changes to text should be "political."

Mr Duff rejected various proposals to merely slim down the constitution text without adding anything new - which he said are also under discussion in the "wise" group of European politicians led by Italian interior minister Giuliano Amato.

"I suspect that the Amato group is to come out with a...simple filleting of part III," he said. "This is mere pathology...What I am trying to do is to rejuvenate the creature."

The British MEP also opposes ideas to drop the name "constitution" and instead call a revised text a "treaty." Such a move would merely spark "contempt" from citizens while disguising the "truth about the scale and scope of integration," he said.

Liberal divisions

Meanwhile, Mr Duff's fellow European liberal party (ELDR) members gathering in Bucharest on Thursday and Friday (12-13 October) failed to reach agreement on a liberal "vision" on the future of the EU following disagreement on key paragraphs on the constitution.

ELDR president and Belgian MEP Annemie Neyts had in the run-up to the congress prepared a draft "vision for a modern and motivating EU" but the document was rejected by member parties and shelved until May next year.

The draft stood in sharp contrast with Mr Duff's plan B, as it said that "a revised text should not be called a 'Constitution'."

The ELDR draft also questioned the institutional Part I of the constitution by stating that "issues such as reducing the size of the Commission...and creating the position of EU President could be removed from the text."

Two-draft referendum

Eurosceptics in the European Parliament, meanwhile, are criticising the recent wave of plans to resuscitate the EU constitution, with Danish member Jens-Peter Bonde stating "instead of manipulating the public by drafting a compressed constitution, we should make a fresh start."

The veteran MEP proposes setting up a new "convention," similar to the body of European politicians that drafted the constitution but this time "directly elected by the people."

The body would have 270 members - with 10 representatives per member state - and work for one year, ideally coming up with two draft treaties - "draft A for a kind of EU state and draft B for a Europe of democracies."

Voters would subsequently be able to choose between the two options - representing radically different scales of European co-operation - in an EU-wide referendum.

"If people go for the federalist option I will accept that," he said adding that he would himself promote draft B - a decentralised EU focusing its work strictly on cross-border issues.

Analysis

First 100 days: Digital and Green Deal policies hit by crises

The first 100 days of Ursula von der Leyen's commission were supposed to be about the digital and environmental transitions. However, that agenda has been hit by first the coronavirus, and now the Greek border situation.

Feature

How corporate lobbyists steer EU law-making

Former EUobserver investigations editor Peter Teffer has written a new book about how lobbying in the EU works. The EU's focus on the internal market offers corporate lobbyists a perfect means to forward their interests.

Investigation

G4S: the EU's preferred security contractor

The British multinational security company G4S lost its contract with the European Parliament in 2011 in a backlash from MEPs over alleged abuses in Israel. Today, they guard the parliament's main entrance and have become the EU's top security provider.

Exclusive

EU commissioner lobbied by energy firm he owns shares in

EU budget commissioner Johannes Hahn owns 2,200 shares in Austria's largest electricity provider. Those shares have tripled in value since he first declared them in 2014. In January, the firm met his head of cabinet to discuss climate policy.

EU transparency on lobbyist meetings still piecemeal

Small steps are being made to reveal who is lobbying who within the EU. But the approach is basically haphazard and piecemeal - meaning the public remains largely in the dark and unable to truly scrutinise the influencers.

'Top-down' future of Europe conference 'will fail' warning

The new president of the Committee of the Regions has warned the EU Commission that a top-down, centralised, Brussels-driven conference will fail to rebuild trust in Europe. Instead, he proposes a stronger say for local and regional authorities.

News in Brief

  1. UK health minister tests positive for coronavirus
  2. Orban: coronavirus exposes EU 'weaknesses'
  3. Court orders Netherlands to pay colonial victims
  4. Belgian cat 'infected by coronavirus'
  5. UK PM Johnson tests positive for coronavirus
  6. EU agrees Libya naval mission after Greek solution
  7. US to upgrade its nuclear bombs in Europe
  8. US surpasses China and Italy with 82,404 corona cases

This is the (finally) approved European Commission

MEPs gave the green light to the entire new European Commission during the plenary session in Strasbourg - but with the abstention of the Greens and a rejection by the leftist group GUE/NGL.

Magazine

Welcome to the EU engine room

Welcome to the EU engine room: the European Parliament (EP's) 22 committees, which churn out hundreds of new laws and non-binding reports each year and which keep an eye on other European institutions.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDAMaking Europe’s Economy Circular – the time is now
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersScottish parliament seeks closer collaboration with the Nordic Council
  3. UNESDAFrom Linear to Circular – check out UNESDA's new blog
  4. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms

Latest News

  1. EU doctors: bring refugees on Greek islands to safety
  2. Russia's top coronavirus 'fake news' stories
  3. WHO warning on lockdown mental health
  4. Virus: Frontex tells officers to keep guarding Greek borders
  5. EU heads struggle to find joint virus response
  6. Poland's sham presidential election in a pandemic
  7. Von der Leyen warns 'end selfishness' in virus crisis
  8. Chinese ambassador to EU: put trust before politics

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us