Friday

19th Jan 2018

Commission: 120 minutes to remove illegal online content

The European Commission is demanding social media platforms share illegal content with police amid broader threats of imposing EU-wide legislation to enforce the takedown of such material.

In a closed-door meeting in Brussels on Tuesday (9 January) between several EU commissioners and some 20 firms, the commission also demanded swifter removals.

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EU home affairs commissioner Dimitris Avramopolous said removals should not take more than two hours.

"Information on removed content should be shared with law enforcement so it can be used as evidence in investigations," he said, along side commissioners Andrus Ansip, Elzbieta Bienkowska, Vera Jourova, Julian King and Mariya Gabriel.

Their demand is part of a broader effort by the EU to coerce the firms to take swifter action against online content deemed to incite hatred, violence and terrorism.

But what constitutes such an incitement to hatred, violence and terrorism is often open to interpretation.

The EU commission, in a paper last September, said "what is illegal offline is also illegal online" although national rules may differ on similar content.

Internet platforms will have to look at individual member state rules, understand and apply their respective cases laws on things like hate speech, and then decide if the content should be removed.

Europol, the EU police agency, already has a special unit designed to refer the content to internet service providers.

But figures on how many referrals led to investigations is unknown given that the agency does not keep such data.

Critics say US firms at risk of fines are instead more likely to remove questionable content regardless of whether it is actually illegal.

"Facebook and Twitter will censor legal material because they are scared of fines," the London-based NGO, Open Rights Group, told the BBC in December.

The firms, which broadly oppose having to police the web, instead want clear regulations, according to EU justice commissioner Jourova.

"Many of them [Silicon Valley] told me that we do not feel ourselves comfortable by being those who decide on this," she told reporters in September.

8,000 tweets per second

The task is large.

Every second around 8,000 messages are posted on Twitter. Over 72,000 people per second view a YouTube video. Another 820 images per second are also uploaded to Instagram.

Earlier this month, Titanic, a German satirical magazine had its Twitter account banned after poking fun at a right-wing AfD member, which poses questions on freedom of expression.

Twitter, along with other social media platforms, now face a potential €50 million fine in Germany since the start of the year if content that violates German hate speech laws is not removed within 24 hours.

Last September, the French ministry of interior had also ordered two Indymedia websites to remove content deemed a "provocation to terrorism".

The same content had been published in more mainstream media outlets but without recrimination from the ministry.

But EU security commissioner King, in a tweet, said more action is needed by the companies.

"Today we discussed, with industry, the need for faster action. If possible on a voluntary basis - but, if necessary we'll look at further steps," he said.

Last year's commission's paper on illegal content, known as a communication, was widely criticised by MEPs who said its ideas on automatic detection of bad content risked undermining rule of law.

The paper also followed the adaption of an EU terrorism directive, which leaves concepts like the definition of indirect incitement to terrorism open to national interpretation.

"The respect for human rights is not an obstacle to security, it is a route towards stronger and better security," Michael O'Flaherty, the director of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency, told MEPs on Monday.

EU wants tech firms to police internet

The European Commission wants private companies to police the internet for hate speech. But civil groups and CEOs of major tech firms object, preferring clear rules and regulations.

EU says Spanish website seizures were legal

Spanish authorities are blocking pro-Catalan websites in the lead up to the referendum in October. Asked whether freedom of expression was being undermined, the EU commission refused to comment.

Macron vows law against fake news

French president Emmanuel Macron has promised legislation to block the spread of fake news, as part of a broader effort to protect liberal democracies from Russian propaganda.

Rights NGOs face fresh threats in EU

While ongoing crackdowns in Poland and Hungary have put the spotlight on rights groups, NGOs are now under new political and financial pressure across the EU, the Fundamental Rights Agency said.

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