Wednesday

17th Jan 2018

Focus

Cyprus is least gay-friendly EU country, study says

  • The ILGA-Europe map shows a clear east-west divide (Photo: ILGA-Europe)

Cyprus is the least gay-friendly EU country followed by Italy, Latvia and Malta according to a new report out by gay-rights group ILGA-Europe.

The study - out to mark International Day Against Homophobia and Transphobia on 17 May - puts Cyprus in the 'red zone' alongside Armenia, Azerbaijan, Macedonia, Russia and Turkey.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The only European countries which scored worse are Belarus, Moldova and Ukraine. Religious countries in eastern and south-eastern Europe generally scored less well than northern and western countries.

The survey notes that unlike many EU members, Cypriot law makes no mention of sexual orientation in its anti-discrimination and hate speech measures. It has never hosted a gay pride event. It has no legal recognition of same sex partnerships and an unequal age of consent for straight and for same-sex couples.

Spain, Sweden and the UK come out as the most progressive. The study noted that Germany and Portugal scored better than last year, while Lithuania and Hungary slid down.

The survey for the first time took into account the rights of trans-gender people as well as gays, lesbians and bisexuals. It looks only at the legislative environment and does not take into account social factors or anecdotal evidence about levels of toleration.

"Europe considers itself a global leader on human rights and equality, but the map and the index clearly show how far we are from being able to claim the title of LGBT [lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans-gender] human rights and equality champions," ILGA-Europe's Linda Freimane said.

LGBTI protection still lacking in EU

Despite some welcome advances, some legal rights for the LGBTI community are lacking in EU member states, and the rise of the populist right is making things worse, conference in Warsaw is told.

LGBTI protection still lacking in EU

Despite some welcome advances, some legal rights for the LGBTI community are lacking in EU member states, and the rise of the populist right is making things worse, conference in Warsaw is told.

Supported by

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. AJC Transatlantic InstituteAJC Calls on EU to Sanction Iran’s Revolutionary Guards, Expel Ambassadors
  2. Dialogue PlatformRoundtable on "Political Islam, Civil Islam and The West" 31 January
  3. ILGA EuropeFreedom of Movement and Same-Sex Couples in Romania – Case Update!
  4. EU2017EEEstonia Completes First EU Presidency, Introduced New Topics to the Agenda
  5. Bio-Based IndustriesLeading the Transition Towards a Post-Petroleum Society
  6. ACCAWelcomes the Start of the New Bulgarian Presidency
  7. Mission of China to the EUPremier Li and President Tusk Stress Importance of Ties at ASEM Summit
  8. EU2017EEVAT on Electronic Commerce: New Rules Adopted
  9. European Jewish CongressChair of EU Parliament Working Group on Antisemitism Condemns Wave of Attacks
  10. Counter BalanceA New Study Challenges the Infrastructure Mega Corridors Agenda
  11. Dialogue PlatformThe Gülen Community: Who to Believe - Politicians or Actions?" by Thomas Michel
  12. Plastics Recyclers Europe65% Plastics Recycling Rate Attainable by 2025 New Study Shows