Thursday

21st Feb 2019

EU's centre-right make Weber their man to replace Juncker

The European centre-right on Thursday (8 November) backed Germany's Manfred Weber to lead their campaign ahead of next year's European election and be their candidate in the race to become the next European Commission president.

The 46-year old Bavarian politician won almost 80 percent of the votes at the European People's Party's congress in Helsinki, against Finland's former prime minister Alexander Stubb.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

This puts Weber in a good position to clinch the top job at the EU executive - even though the EPP group leader in the European Parliament has never held an executive job before.

"The campaign starts here in Helsinki," said Weber, a Bavarian Catholic, who said he wants to build a Europe where people feel at home. In his speech at the congress he said people view the EU as an elitist project.

The EPP is expected to remain the largest party in the European Parliament after the May 2019 elections, although could suffer losses, and would need coalition partners to set up a majority in the parliament.

After the elections, it is then up to EU leaders to choose the president of the European Commission and thus far they have not committed to automatically choosing the leader of the EP's majority.

Weber told reporters that EU leaders need to respect the will of the people.

Germany's Angela Merkel and other EU leaders have all backed Weber, a conservative compared to Stubb's more liberal approach.

Weber, whose task is now to take on populists and anti-establishment parties - which are expected to gain more seats in the election - also said he wants to defend Europe's Christian heritage.

But Weber ruled out forging an alliance with populists in the European parliament to secure a majority after May.

The so-called Spitzenkandidaten process (German for 'lead candidate') was created to galvanise voters for the European election in 2014.

Polls after that election said that less than five percent of voters actually felt inspired by the Spitzenkandidaten process, but an internal EPP poll now said that now stands at 17 percent, an EPP source said - admitting that the hike in voters' interest is also due to the EU-wide economic and migration crises.

Weber vs Timmermans vs X?

Weber will run against Dutch commissioner, the Social Democrat Frans Timmermans, who is expected to be endorsed by the socialist European political family, and the liberals have - so far - not put forward a united candidate under the process.

EPP delegates took pride in being the only large party organising a competition for the lead candidate position, while other parties complain that the process is designed to favour the EPP - which is this way can secure the commission presidency.

"My congratulations to Manfred Weber, but it will be a tough race. The EPP of Mr Orban and Mr Kurz is no longer a reliable partner for Europe," leader of the socialist group leader in the parliament, Udo Bullman tweeted referring to the two EPP leaders, Hungary's Viktor Orban and Austria's Sebastian Kurz, with a hardline anti-immigration stance.

Criticism of Macron

Liberals, who are meeting in Madrid on Thursday, are expected to create an alliance with Emmanuel Macron. The French president has been attacked several times at the conservative congress.

EPP leaders and officials claimed Macron is only acting as the "saviour of Europe" against populism in order to dominate the headlines and divide the conservatives. "I don't need liberals or any new movement to tell us what the future of Europe is," Weber said in his speech.

However, there have been concerns among the EPP that a new pro-EU alliance by Macron could sway some of the EPP more centrist members, who are frustrated by the centre-right party's inability to discipline Hungary's premier Orban, whose country is under an EU sanctions procedure for being in "clear risk" of breaching EU values and rules.

The EPP adopted on Wednesday (6 November) a resolution on defending EU values in order to quieten down questions about how Orban's self-proclaimed "illiberal democracy" fits with European values of rule of law and democracy.

Orban's Fidesz party managed to tone down the resolution, which does not specifically mention Hungary, by taking out references to liberal democracy.

EPP divisions

The EPP wanted to show a united front in Helsinki, but divisions remained between a more liberal-minded and a conservative wing, which is less concerned by Orban and the populism he represents.

Those were clearly revealed by EU council president Donald Tusk, who told delegates: "If you want to replace the Western model of liberal democracy with an Eastern model of 'authoritarian democracy', you are not a Christian Democrat".

EPP poised to pick lead candidate, amid struggle over Orban

The EU's largest political family has gathered in Helsinki to chose its lead candidate for the European election next May. They need to take on populists - but are struggling to deal with the 'enfant terrible' within their own ranks.

German conservative to run for Juncker's job

Manfred Weber, leader of the largest, centre-right group in the EP, has announced his bid to succeed Juncker at the helm of the European Commission. But his lack of experience and handling of Hungary's Orban are already raising questions.

Why 'Spitzenkandidat' is probably here to stay

The power of the parliament to 'appoint' the president of the EU Commission is new, highly-contested - and not universally understood. In fact, even some of the lead candidates to replace Jean-Claude Juncker are against it.

Agenda

Merkel and Brexit in spotlight This WEEK

The now-outgoing German chancellor will outline her vision for Europe in the EU parliament, as political parties gear up for the election next May. Brexit will also dominate, even though talks have yet to yield a breakthrough.

News in Brief

  1. Tusk to back pro-EU candidates in Polish EP vote
  2. Germany rejects UK appeal on Saudi arms sales
  3. French senators decry 'dysfunction' on Macron security aide affair
  4. France to ban far-right groups over antisemitism
  5. Swedish climate activist to face Juncker in Brussels
  6. Swedish MEP calls for discussion on Orban in EPP
  7. EU countries back copyright reform
  8. Germany keeps EU commission in dark on Dieselgate

Opinion

Italy will keep blinking in 2019

Italy's 'marriage of convenience' coalition government likes picking battles with Brussels. But with the economy now in recession, and deputy prime minister Matteo Salvini needing to keep the business lobby on board, expect Rome to blink first.

Opinion

The test for Sweden's new government

While the formation of a new government ends Sweden's fourth-month paralysis, it doesn't resolve the challenge from radical-right populists in Sweden. A key question remains: will treating populists like pariahs undercut the appeal of their, often anti-rights, politics?

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  2. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership
  3. Intercultural Dialogue PlatformRoundtable: Muslim Heresy and the Politics of Human Rights, Dr. Matthew J. Nelson
  4. Platform for Peace and JusticeTurkey suffering from the lack of the rule of law
  5. UNESDASoft Drinks Europe welcomes Tim Brett as its new president
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers take the lead in combatting climate change
  7. Counter BalanceEuropean Parliament takes incoherent steps on climate in future EU investments
  8. International Partnership For Human RightsKyrgyz authorities have to immediately release human rights defender Azimjon Askarov
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersSeminar on disability and user involvement
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersInternational appetite for Nordic food policies
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic Innovation House in Hong Kong
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region has chance to become world leader when it comes to start-ups

Latest News

  1. Microsoft warns EU on election hack threat
  2. Brexit talks to continue after May-Juncker meeting
  3. Trump and Kurz: not best friends, after all
  4. EU commission appeals Dieselgate ruling
  5. 'No burning crisis' on migrant arrivals, EU agency says
  6. 'No evidence' ECB bond-buying helped euro economy
  7. Juncker: Orban should leave Europe's centre-right
  8. College of Europe alumni ask rector to cut Saudi ties

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersTheresa May: “We will not be turning our backs on the Nordic region”
  2. International Partnership for Human RightsOpen letter to Emmanuel Macron ahead of Uzbek president's visit
  3. International Partnership for Human RightsRaising key human rights concerns during visit of Turkmenistan's foreign minister
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region presented in Brussels
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersThe vital bioeconomy. New issue of “Sustainable Growth the Nordic Way” out now
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic gender effect goes international
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersPaula Lehtomaki from Finland elected as the Council's first female Secretary General
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic design sets the stage at COP24, running a competition for sustainable chairs
  9. Counter BalanceIn Kenya, a motorway funded by the European Investment Bank runs over roadside dwellers
  10. ACCACompany Law Package: Making the Best of Digital and Cross Border Mobility,
  11. International Partnership for Human RightsCivil Society Worried About Shortcomings in EU-Kyrgyzstan Human Rights Dialogue
  12. UNESDAThe European Soft Drinks Industry Supports over 1.7 Million Jobs

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us