Sunday

23rd Jul 2017

Sarkozy and Merkel offer Barroso 'conditional' backing

  • Mr Barroso (l) should present a clear programme, Mr Sarkozy (r) said. (Photo: © European Community, 2008)

France and Germany are refusing to give EU commission president Jose Manuel Barroso full formal backing to become head of the institution for a second time at next week's summit, insisting the support should be political only.

The two leaders on Thursday (11 June) said that their backing for the Portuguese politician was "unambiguous" but not unconditional.

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"Important personnel and policy decisions must be taken immediately. That is why Germany and France support Jose Manuel Barroso," German chancellor Angela Merkel said at a joint press conference with French president Nicolas Sarkozy in Paris.

The French leader echoed these statements, but explained that France and Germany wanted "a political decision" on Mr Barroso's reappointment to be reached at the 18-19 June EU summit, not a "formal" one.

"I can tell you that Ms Merkel and myself, we will support Mr Barroso's candidacy, without ambiguity," Mr Sarkozy said.

"We wish… that a political decision be taken at the next [European] Council" to appoint Mr Barroso for a second mandate, "before taking a formal legal decision" later on, he added.

The French leader explained that this "political decision" could then be "ratified" by the European Parliament in July.

The manoeuvre would be made in order to avoid appointing the entire EU commission under the Treaty of Nice on which the EU is currently based and which foresees a reduction in the number of commissioners in the next commission.

On the other hand, if the Lisbon treaty is eventually agreed, the number of commissioners remains the same, following a political agreement by EU leaders last year.

If Ireland approves the Lisbon Treaty in a second referendum that should take place in the autumn, "there will be… a second decision to name the commission president, this time based on Lisbon and not Nice."

Keeping Mr Barroso in a legal limbo would also give both leaders more say over the portfolios of their new commissioners.

Clash with Sweden

The two leaders also insisted that Mr Barroso had to present a clear programme in order to win their total backing.

"We have asked Mr Barroso… to clarify, to make formal, in a way, his intentions before this second term," the French president said, explaining that Mr Barroso had to commit himself to "a Europe that protects Europeans" and to improving financial regulation – both points being dear to Paris.

"It is Mr Barroso and a programme. Or a programme and Mr Barroso," Mr Sarkozy added.

The terms of the re-appointment of Mr Barroso is set to be a flash point at next week's summit with Sweden, as incoming EU presidency, insisting that he be given full approval so Stockholm has an able partner to work with over the second half of the year.

Opposition in the parliament

Meanwhile, opposition to Mr Barroso is building up in the EU parliament, which will vote on the commission president nominee in July.

The leader of the Socialist group in the parliament, Martin Schulz, wrote to EU leaders on Thursday urging them to delay their decision because of the need for a commission "that puts people first" as well as for a clear legal basis for the appointment.

"Any attempt to force a rapid decision in this matter could only lead to a rejection from our Group," Mr Schulz warned.

The Socialists suffered a blow at the European elections, but remain the second biggest force in the new parliament. Mr Barroso's candidacy is also opposed by some Liberal and Green MEPs.

Poland 'leaving EU community of values'

Leading MEPs and legal watchdogs have raised the alarm on Polish judicial reforms, but the European Commission declined to speak out so far.

Security and defence to top EU summit

Pressure is mounting for social media platforms to remove any online content deemed to incite terrorism. Draft conclusions, seen by EUobserver, have made the issue a top priority in leaders' talks next week.

Cyprus talks up in the air

A week after the failure of negotiations to reunite the islands, Greek Cypriots are calling on Turkish Cypriots to reaffirm their commitment to the process.

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