Monday

23rd Oct 2017

Focus

MEPs' biofuel vote could bring production to 'standstill'

European legislators in an influential parliamentary committee have voted to drastically scale back the EU's plans for the use of biofuels.

In a 50 to 2 vote MEPs in the European Parliament's industry committee on Thursday (11 September) voted to maintain a target of using renewable sources for transport fuel for 10 percent of vehicles by 2020, but legislators no longer assume that renewable fuel sources automatically means traditional biofuels.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

  • The European biofuels industry is worried they are losing the argument (Photo: Notat)

By 2020, two fifths of the 10 percent target would now have to come via cars that run on hydrogen or that use electricity from renewable sources such as solar and wind power, or from so-called second-generation biofuels.

MEPs also voted for a major review in 2014 of biofuel impact on the environment and on food prices before member states can press on to the 2020 goal.

Green campaigners and development NGOs are frustrated that original targets have not been dropped entirely.

But the European biofuel industry has been dealt a major blow, with some producers saying that if the committee proposals become EU law, they would bring European biofuels production to a "standstill."

Sustainability criteria

Those biofuels that are used would also immediately have to provide a 45 percent greenhouse gas emissions saving compared to fossil fuels, rising to a 60 percent saving by 2015.

The entire parliament - which is to consider the issue at its October plenary - and member states must still approve the legislation before the bill is enacted, but perspectives on biofuels are beginning to align.

EU member states are close to agreement on a two-stage approach similar to that passed in the industry committee, but a provisional consensus is of an initial 35 percent saving on fossil fuels rising to 50 percent by 2017.

A figure familiar with the negotiations said the likely ultimate compromise will be a 40 percent savings initially and 55 percent by 2016. "The final figures are a no-brainer," he said.

Producers aghast

The biofuels industry has been scathing in its response to the parliament committee vote, saying the European biofuels industy, if not biofuels elsewhere, was under threat.

"The parliament puts at risk over €5 billion invested in EU biofuel production capacity and all the employment linked to it," warned the European Bioethanol Fuel Association in a statement. "The proposed intermediate target of four percent biofuels by 2015 imposes a standstill."

Producers believe the parliament's threshold for emissions savings immediately eliminates European producers of biofuels from the running, as many cannot achieve 45 percent improvements over petrol.

"[The] decision....will as a result cut off more than 80 percent of the biofuels produced in Europe, strategically favouring non-EU producers," warned the European Biodiesel Board.

One green campaigner told the EUobserver "There has been an enormous lobbying effort from the biofuels industry in Brussels, but now watch the gloves come off."

Indirect land-use change

Environmentalists have for some time argued that whatever the savings of biofuels against fossil fuels, their very production still displaces the production of farming for food or animal feed that otherwise would have taken place. This food production still has to take place somewhere, leading to deforestation or the use of grasslands for agriculture.

This displacement effect is known as indirect land-use change (ILUC) and causes some of the greatest greenhouse gas emissions and pressures on food prices.

Although MEPs adopted the principle of including ILUC in calculations of greenhouse gas emissions, any penalties for the effect have been almost eliminated.

Environmentalists favour an ILUC-related "penalty" of 120g of CO2 per megajoule in a complex formula used to compare biofuels with fossil fuels. Such a penalty would eliminate most biofuels produced from food crops from being able to be used in Europe, as it would mean they would no longer be able to deliver a 45 percent emissions savings on petrol.

A penalty of 120g would thus permit only second-generation fuels produced from material such as agricultural waste, forestry waste or algae.

But instead the industry committee voted for a penalty of 0g until 2012, at which point the penalty rises to 40g, except in the case of second-generation biofuels and "where the commission has deemed" that biofuels do not have an indirect land-use impact.

"This is the same commission that has been trying to push through the 10 percent biofuels target in the face of all scientific evidence? I'm not optimistic that their evaluation will be done properly," said Pieter de Pous of the European Environmental Bureau.

Binding interim targets

The biofuels targets are one part of legislation attempting to encourage the use of renewable energy in the European Union.

The cross-party vote in the industry committee would now see binding interim renewable energy targets for each EU member between now and 2020. Previously, according to the commission's proposals, the executive would have had to wait until 2020 to evaluate whether a member state had failed to meet such targets. The commission would also be able to impose fines for not meeting these interim milestones.

Other provisions in the bill include easing access of renewable sources to electricity and gas networks and measures to encourage the use of renewable energy for the heating of new buildings.

European Transport

Careful transport policy is seen as key to helping the EU on its way to economic recovery. But it needs to take into account two big factors - empty public coffers and environmental concerns. EUobserver turns the spotlight on the latest developments in the sector.

Transport no longer a 'nuisance' policy, Kallas says

EU transport policy has been transformed from being regarded as a 'nuisance' policy to being seen as key to achieving the Union's longterm economic goals, the EU transport chief tells EUobserver.

Brussels to unveil 'core' transport network in September

The European Commission is in September due to publish an overhaul of its approach to achieving the longterm plan of connecting Europe's railways, airports, ports and roads. It is expected to unleash a furious bout of lobbying.

'Whatever we do the pirates have adapted'

The number of pirate attacks off Somalia has increased dramatically in recent years, putting a physical and mental toll on seafarers and provoking a discussion on whether to boycott dangerous waters.

Arctic shipping routes unlikely to be 'Suez of the north'

Shipping and mineral companies are salivating at the prospect of new shipping routes in the Arctic as sea ice begins its global warming-induced retreat. The North Sea Route could be a boon for northern European companies. But caveats abound, not least for the environment.

Denmark to be electric cars guinea pig

Talk of electric cars is everywhere at the moment. But taking the prototype from the car show room and turning it into the vehicle of choice for millions of Europeans is a huge task. A project in Denmark will test the waters later this year.

Catalan MPs weigh independence declaration

A crucial week is ahead in Catalonia as its leaders decide whether to declare independence - an illegal move according to the Spanish government – or yield to pressure from Madrid.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Martens CentreI Say Europe, You Say...? Interview With Commission VP Jyrki Katainen
  2. Mission of China to the EUPresident Xi Jinping Proposes Stronger Global Security Governance at Interpol Assembly
  3. European Friends of ArmeniaEU Engagement Could Contribute to Lasting Peace in Nagorno-Karabakh
  4. UNICEFViolence in Myanmar Driving 12,000 Rohingya Refugee Children Into Bangladesh Every Week
  5. European Jewish CongressBulgaria Applauded for Adopting the Working Definition of Antisemitism
  6. EU2017EENorth Korea Leaves Europe No Choice, Says Estonian Foreign Minister Sven Mikser
  7. Mission of China to the EUZhang Ming Appointed New Ambassador of the Mission of China to the EU
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsEU Should Seek Concrete Commitments From Azerbaijan at Human Rights Dialogue
  9. European Jewish CongressEJC Calls for New Austrian Government to Exclude Extremist Freedom Party
  10. CES - Silicones EuropeIn Healthcare, Silicones Are the Frontrunner. And That's a Good Thing!
  11. EU2017EEEuropean Space Week 2017 in Tallinn from November 3-9. Register Now!
  12. European Entrepreneurs CEA-PMEMobiliseSME Exchange Programme Open Doors for 400 Companies Across Europe

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. CECEE-Privacy Regulation – Hands off M2M Communication!
  2. ILGA-EuropeHealth4LGBTI: Reducing Health Inequalities Experienced by LGBTI People
  3. EU2017EEEHealth: A Tool for More Equal Health
  4. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Tourism a Key Driver for Job Creation and Enhanced Competitiveness
  5. CECENon-Harmonised Homologation of Mobile Machinery Costs € 90 Million per Year
  6. ILGA-EuropeMass Detention of Azeri LGBTI People - the LGBTI Community Urgently Needs Your Support
  7. European Free AllianceCatalans Have Won the Right to Have an Independent State
  8. ECR GroupBrexit: Delaying the Start of Negotiations Is Not a Solution
  9. EU2017EEPM Ratas in Poland: "We Enjoy the Fruits of European Cooperation Thanks to Solidarity"
  10. Mission of China to the EUChina and UK Discuss Deepening of Global Comprehensive Strategic Partnership
  11. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceEHLA Joins Commissioners Navracsics, Andriukaitis and Hogan at EU Week of Sport
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council Representative Office Opens in Brussels to Foster Better Cooperation