Tuesday

10th Dec 2019

Investigation

Very private security

  • A member of US special forces on guard duty in Afghanistan (Photo: ussocom_ru)

EU diplomats work in some of the world's most dangerous places. The men who guard them cost up to €17,000 each a month. But are they worth the money? Are the diplomats safe? Does the EU award the contracts fairly? Two recent fiascos in Afghanistan and Libya pose the questions. EUobserver investigates.

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About Andrew Rettman

Andrew Rettman writes about foreign relations for EUobserver. He joined the site in 2005 and specialises in Israel, Russia, the EU foreign service and security issues. He was born in Warsaw, Poland.

EUobserver investigative reports

EUobserver's look at private security firms is the latest in its series of investigative reports. Our investigations aim to take a critical look at events behind the scenes in EU institutions or to explore the real meaning of EU decisions.

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Agenda

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