Tuesday

24th Apr 2018

Focus

Pressure mounts on EU cloud deal as deadline looms

  • The commission has two weeks to meets its EU cloud deadline (Photo: The Planet)

The European Commission is under pressure to keep to its self-imposed September deadline to publish an EU cloud computing strategy, as new evidence revealed widespread public confusion about it.

Figures collected by opinion pollsters Ipsos for the Business Software Alliance (BSA), an IT lobby group, indicate that most Europeans regularly use cloud technologies but are unaware that they are doing so.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

A mere 24 percent said that they used cloud computing, with Greece and Romania topping the poll at 39 percent. Meanwhile 65 percent of PC users admitted that they had either never heard of cloud computing or had only heard of the name.

However, four in five European's regularly use email services, the most commonly-used cloud service, with more than one in three regularly playing online games and using photo storage devices like Dropbox.

In February, Digital Agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes told the World Economic Forum that cloud computing would deliver “secure services for greater efficiency, greater flexibility, and lower cost," unveiling a €10 million public/private deal on cloud public procurement. She also pledged to produce EU cloud proposals by July although internal disagreements within the EU executive saw the delivery date pushed back to September.

Meanwhile, the progress of cloud-related legislation has also been slower than expected.

Regulating the use of cloud computing data is part of the EU's revamped data protection laws initiated by Justice Commissioner Viviane Reding in January. The parliament has yet to produce a draft report on the dossier, with commission sources conceding that the data package is unlikely to be agreed before 2014, taking it perilously close to the next European elections when all unfinished legislation is scrapped.

Supporters of cloud services claim that it offers large potential savings to businesses and governments by allowing them to store huge amounts of data cheaply and easily accessible.

Research published by the International Data Corporation in August found that revenue from public IT cloud services exceeded $21.5 billion (€17bn) in 2010 and will reach $72.9 billion (€58bn) in 2015, representing an annual growth rate of 27.6%, more than four times the projected growth for the worldwide IT market as a whole (6.7%).

Meanwhile, the personal data already held in clouds is already estimated at €75 billion and expected to increase further.

Despite this, the technology sets new regulatory challenges for policy-makers. The volume of information stored, as well as the mobility of cloud data, puts extra strain on international data protection measures to police data processing and protect personal information.

Thomas Boue, BSA’s Director of Government Affairs, said the “the EU should make cloud computing an immediate concern for all dossiers affecting its development.”

Describing the keenly-awaited EU cloud strategy as “a welcome step in the right direction” he added that legislators should take “the opportunity to promote the full potential of cloud computing in Europe.”

Greenland votes with eye on independence

Six out of seven political parties running in Greenland's parliamentary elections on Tuesday are pro-independence, but they disagree on how fast the last ties to Copenhagen should be cut. Increasing dependence on China could be the consequence.

News in Brief

  1. Far-right attack migrants on Greek island
  2. Merkel defends accepting UN refugees
  3. EU commissioner plans Malta 'money laundering' inspection
  4. Survey: Half of high polluting farms receive CAP subsidies
  5. Commission will 'not shy away' from Malta killing repercussions
  6. EU Commission opens probe on Alitalia state loan
  7. Paris suspect given 20-year sentence for Brussels shoot-out
  8. Merkel and Pena Nieto praise EU-Mexico trade agreement

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of Ministers12 Recommendations for Nordic Leadership on Climate and Environment
  2. Macedonian Human Rights MovementOxford Professor Calls for an End to the Anti-Macedonian Name Negotiations
  3. ACCAPeople Who Speak-Up Should Feel Safe to Do So
  4. Mission of China to the EUProgress on China-EU Cooperation
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersWorld's Energy Ministers to Meet in Oresund in May to Discuss Green Energy
  6. ILGA EuropeParabéns! Portugal Votes to Respect the Rights of Trans and Intersex People
  7. Mission of China to the EUJobs, Energy, Steel: Government Work Report Sets China's Targets
  8. Martens CentreJoin Us at NET@WORK2018 Featuring Debates on Migration, Foreign Policy, Populism & Disinformation
  9. European Jewish CongressKantor Center Annual Report on Antisemitism Worldwide - The Year the Mask Came Off
  10. UNICEFCalls for the Protection of Children in the Gaza Strip
  11. Mission of China to the EUForeign Minister Wang Yi Highlights Importance of China-EU Relations
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersImmigration and Integration in the Nordic Region - Getting the Facts Straight

Latest News

  1. Juncker delays air quality action due to busy agenda
  2. Spain makes bid for EU anti-pirate HQ
  3. How Russian propaganda depicts Europe - should we worry?
  4. MEPs tell Chinese ambassador of concerns on trade
  5. Greenland votes with eye on independence
  6. EU court delivers blow to anti-abortion activists
  7. Hungary activists defiant after 'Soros Mercenaries' attack
  8. European Commission proposes whistleblower protection law