Tuesday

31st Mar 2020

Old books only in European Digital Library

The EU wants to digitalise and online the vast volumes of cultural works in member state libraries to make them accessible to all, but unless the issue of copyright and intellectual property rights are solved, the European Digital Library may consist only of books and journals published before the 1920s.

The European Commission in August urged the 25 EU member states to speed up and co-operate on the setting up of a European-wide digital library.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or join as a group

In its recommendation, Brussels called on governments to deal with obstacles such as copyright questions and reasons for delays in the digitalisation of materials, which include books, journals, newspapers, photographs, museum objects, films and other cultural works.

The two main incentives for the digitalisation move are the preservation of cultural heritage and academic research.

"Each year, hundreds of works in Europe's libraries are destroyed by old age," says commission IT spokesman Martin Selmayr.

The aim is to have at least 2 million cultural works accessible via the European Digital Library by 2008, and at least six million volumes by 2010.

Will living authors see their work online?

But until a solution is found, only volumes already in the public domain - works no longer covered by intellectual property rights - will be available online.

Literary, dramatic, musical and artistic works are covered by intellectual property rights for the lifetime of the author plus a period of 70 years from the end of the year in which the author dies.

This means works being digitalised for the library will mainly be from before the 1920s unless the issue of intellectual property rights is dealt with.

"This is one of the main topics in all discussions going on at the moment," says Britta Woldering of Deutsche Nationalbibliothek and CENL – a group of national librarians.

"The issue of copyright is the biggest barrier for digitalisation," she said.

Ms Woldering said many libraries with digitalised works could only show them in their own reading rooms. "It's like keeping them in a black box, which is ridiculous if you think how many readers they could reach online," she noted.

The Deutsche Nationalbibliothek is following Europe's plans for copyright and intellectual property rights very closely. The relatively new library dates from 1913 with most of the collection still very much under copyright.

"For recent content, copyright is an issue," Mr Selmayr admitted. "Only by agreements between the rights holders will it work out, but there is no one-size-fit-all solution for this."

"We need to protect the rights of the authors because otherwise there will be no authors," he said.

However, the European Publishers Council (EPC) does not share the view that intellectual property rights are an obstruction to the commission initiative.

"Copyright and related rights are not legislative barriers," says Angela Mills Wade from the EPC. "On the contrary, they are enablers which make it possible for rights creators - the source of Europe's cultural heritage - to make works available."

But she adds that the digitisation of works should only occur if they are already in the public domain and/or with the consent of the rights holder and under terms and agreed by the publishers.

Authors fear being hailed as the bad guys

"Some even question the very concept of copyright, implying that authors are standing in the way of progress and the free flow of information," Trond Andreassen, head of the European writers congress, wrote in a recommendation to the commission at the beginning of the year.

"As writers, we need copyright and the incentive, both moral and financial, it gives to keep us writing," he added.

At the same time, he also underlined the importance of having recent work included in the digital library. "Authors want their works to be read and used."

A ‘loose-fitting' EU copyright directive from 2001 has meant that the law has been interpreted differently by the member states, leading to differing copyright laws in the 25 EU countries.

A committee working on how to best achieve a digital library was set up earlier this year specifically to deal with copyright issues in relation to digital libraries between member states and the different players.

The European digital library is set to develop around the already existing portal of The European Library's (TEL) infrastructure, which is currently a gateway to the catalogues in a number of EU national libraries.

The aim of the project is to achieve a portal to the digitised cultural works of Europe's cultural institutions such as libraries, archives and museums.

But will a digital library lead to ‘physical' libraries ceasing to exist?

"No, not at all," says Ms Woldering. "Printing of material is on the rise and ‘physical' users are increasingly filling up the reading rooms."

To read more on this topic click here for EUobserver's special FOCUS on Creative Rights

France launches Francophone digital library

The French national library BNF has launched a prototype version of its contribution to a European digital library aimed as one of the European alternatives to US digitalisations of books and documents.

Pressure mounts on EU cloud deal as deadline looms

The European Commission is under pressure to keep to its self-imposed September deadline to publish an EU cloud computing strategy, as new evidence revealed widespread public confusion about it.

News in Brief

  1. 12-year old Belgian girl dies of coronavirus
  2. EU Commission: no 'indefinite' emergency measures
  3. Denmark plans 'gradual' return to normal after Easter
  4. Globally over 780,000 cases of coronavirus, 37,000 deaths
  5. EU states losing 3% of GDP a month, IMF says
  6. Fruit pickers need to cross borders too, EU says
  7. Former Slovak minister to become EU envoy on Kosovo-Serbia
  8. Hungary's Orban wins rule-by-decree vote in parliament

Podcast

Věra Jourová on surveillance and Covid-19

Commissioner for values and transparency, Věra Jourová, says Brussels will vet moves in Hungary to give prime minister Viktor Orbán scope to rule by decree and urges Facebook and Google to push official health advice to WhatsApp and YouTube.

Agenda

EU struggles to remain united This WEEK

EU countries continue to wrestle with economic shock of pandemic and with sharing of medical resources, posing deep questions on solidarity in the bloc.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDAMaking Europe’s Economy Circular – the time is now
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersScottish parliament seeks closer collaboration with the Nordic Council
  3. UNESDAFrom Linear to Circular – check out UNESDA's new blog
  4. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us