Saturday

20th Aug 2022

Creative sector 'forgotten and marginalised' by the EU

  • Cultural industries, such as the film industry, play an important economic role in the EU (Photo: European Commission)

The European Commission is ignoring the economic potential of cultural issues, focusing too much on standard industry policies and not enough on creative industries, say experts.

According to a report by the Brussels-based consultancy KEA, which specialises in creative rights, cultural industries - like the music, film and game industries - and creative industries - like design and architecture - contributed an estimated 2.6 percent to the Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of the EU in 2003.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

In the same year, culture was also of the main attractors of tourism - and the tourism sector represents an additional 5.5% of GDP.

Philippe Kern, managing director of KEA, says that "while innovation is a policy darling – policy makers can set targets and objectives - creativity is forgotten and marginalised from a EU policy point of view."

"Give creativity the same political profile as innovation. Raise the profile of the creativity sector," he told an audience of members of the European Parliament's culture committee on Tuesday (20 November).

The KEA study says that the culture and creativity sectors had a estimated turnover of € 654 billion in 2003, more than twice as much as the European car industry, and employed about six million people.

In addition, they outperform the rest of the economy, growing 12.3% faster than the overall economy between 1999-2003.

But the creative sector only received 1.1 billion euro in funding from the EU, much less than the €56.6 billion spent by the EU on innovation, or the 308 billion made available for structural development.

According to Mr Kern, the composition of the cultural industry – mostly small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) – and the lack of statistical data available about the industry make it difficult for policy makers to realise the true importance of the sector.

To increase the economic gains from culture, Mr Kern recommended improving the financial capabilities of these SMEs and supporting entrepreneurs in developing new business models adapted to internet.

In addition, he said statistical information on the creative sector should be gathered while cultural goods should be an integral part of trade agreement negotiations.

Mr Kern was backed up by several other speakers in the committee which was discussing the overall theme of the relationship the internal market and cultural issues.

Mr Yannick Guin, deputy mayor of Nantes said that "cultural industries are not a luxury or an accessory, but they are at the heart of development."

Meanwhile, Guy Bono, French socialist MEP, underlined that "culture needs economy and economy needs culture."

The discussion fits into a general debate in the EU at the moment, prompted by the reigning pro-market commission, about the extent to whether cultural issues should be exempted from internal market rules

IT bugs haunt work of EU fraud busters

EU efforts to fight fraud have been hampered by bugs and delays in an €29m IT system meant to help manage investigations more efficiently.

EU reaches deal on flagship cybersecurity law

The European Parliament and EU member states have reached an agreement over new rules intended to protect Europe's public and private critical entities from cyberattacks.

Opinion

The Digital Services Act — a case-study in keeping public in dark

Companies and lobby groups like Spotify, Google and International Federation of the Phonographic Industry (IFPI) were able to lobby member states using live knowledge of the trilogue discussions on content-ranking systems, advertising and liability for search engines.

Stakeholder

The CPDP conference wants multidisciplinary digital future

During the Computers, Privacy and Data Protection (CPDP) conference, many high-level discussions will touch upon the dynamics of decision-making in the design of new technologies, including the importance of inclusion, diversity, and ethics perspectives within these processes.

News in Brief

  1. China joins Russian military exercises in Vostok
  2. Ukraine nuclear plant damage would be 'suicide', says UN chief
  3. Denmark to invest €5.5bn in new warships
  4. German economy stagnates, finance ministry says
  5. Syria received stolen grain, says Ukraine envoy
  6. Truss still leads in next UK PM polling
  7. UN chief meets Zelensky and Erdogan over grain exports
  8. Fighting stalls ahead of UN visit, Ukraine says

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic prime ministers: “We will deepen co-operation on defence”
  2. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBConstruction workers can check wages and working conditions in 36 countries
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  4. European Centre for Press and Media FreedomEuropean Anti-SLAPP Conference 2022
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis

Latest News

  1. European inflation hits 25-year high, driven by energy spike
  2. No breakthrough in EU-hosted Kosovo/Serbia talks
  3. Letter to the Editor: Rosatom responds on Zaporizhzhia
  4. Could the central Asian 'stan' states turn away from Moscow?
  5. Serbia expects difficult talks with Kosovo at EU meeting
  6. How scary is threat to Ukraine's Zaporizhzhia nuclear plant?
  7. Slovakia's government stares into the abyss
  8. Finland restricts Russian tourist visas

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us