Tuesday

20th Feb 2018

Iceland puts former PM on trial over financial crisis

Iceland's former Prime Minister Geir Haarde on Monday (5 March) became the world's first leader to be put on trial on charges of negligence over the 2008 financial crisis.

Haarde, who was a premier from 2006 to 2009, is being accused of "gross negligence" in failing to prevent the collapse of Iceland's top three banks - Glitnir, Kaupthing and Landsbanki – all heavily involved in risky investments on the US real estate market.

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  • Icesave ad in London: Britain is demanding compensation for the bankrupt bank (Photo: mydogminton)

One of the main architects of Iceland's transformation from a fishing nation into a financial services hub, Haarde is also accused of failing to control the country's fast-growing banks and of having withheld information indicating the country was heading for financial disaster. He faces a sentence of up to two years in prison if found guilty.

"None of us realised at the time that there was something fishy within the banking system itself, as now appears to have been the case," Haarde told the Reykjavik court on Monday. He denied all charges and said that "only in hindsight is it evident that not everything was as it should have been."

Unlike EU countries, Iceland allowed its banks to go bust. The tiny nation of 320,000 people was forced to borrow €7.5 billion from the International Monetary Fund and other lenders, but its economy has since rebounded and was upgraded to investment status by Fitch ratings agency in February.

Icelanders in a referendum last year also rejected a deal aimed at paying some €4 billion in compensation to the UK and the Netherlands, whose citizens had put their savings in Icelandic banks. This has turned into a major irritant in Iceland's EU membership bid, which sees waning support among its people.

A February poll carried out by Gallup shows that only 26.3 percent back EU membership, down from 37 percent in January. A referendum on joining the EU may be held as early as next year, its government said.

Netherlands: 'No way now for Iceland to join EU'

Mixed messages on the status of Iceland's EU accession application are coming from different actors in the bloc. But a member of the Dutch government's Council of Economic Advisors has said that after Iceland's second rejection by referendum on an agreement intended to resolve a bitter banking dispute between the Hague and the small island, there is now "no way" Iceland will be able to join the European Union.

Iceland voters reject Icesave deal for a second time

Iceland's bitter row with the Netherlands and the UK over the loss of billions of depositors' money in a collapsed online bank has reached a new stage after Icelandic voters on Saturday rejected for the second time a deal to resolve the issue.

Baltic states demand bigger EU budget

The leaders of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania say in a joint letter that they are open to talks on creating "new own resources" for a bigger EU budget after the UK leaves the EU.

EU-Latin America trade talks move to 'endgame'

Senior negotiators in the EU-Mercosur talks will meet in Brussels on Friday to work out the technical bits of a possible trade deal, after top political officials gave the talks a final push.

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