Tuesday

19th Jun 2018

Commission eyes end of 'one-size-fits-all' farm policy

  • EU commissioner Jyrki Katainen (l) and Phil Hogan present their ideas about the future of the common agriculture policy (Photo: European Commission)

The European Commission wants to give national governments more flexibility in how they implement the EU's long-controversial common agriculture policy.

"We have concluded that a one-size-fits-all approach to implementation is not always appropriate for a union of 500 million citizens," said EU agriculture commissioner Phil Hogan at a press conference on Wednesday (29 November).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... our join as a group

  • Cows on a farm in Burgundy, France. The goals of the EU farming policy would remain the same for all states, but the implementation in France could differ from other countries (Photo: Stijn te Strake)

"There has been a lot of criticism in relation to complexity of policy and the manner in which it has been implemented," he added.

Hogan spoke at the publication of a 'communication', a commission strategy paper, about the future reform of the common agriculture policy (CAP).

"We are taking the bold step to give member states more subsidiarity," said Hogan.

He was flanked by commission vice-president Jyrki Katainen, in charge of jobs and growth.

In simple terms, the Finn summarised the proposed change as follows: "'What to do' is decided here [in Brussels], 'how to do' is decided more and more at national level. The policies stay here, but the implementation is more in the hands of the member states."

"We don't want to renationalise the CAP," Katainen added.

Hogan said that the one-size-fits-all approach was particularly unfit for the CAP's environmental goals.

"We will allow member states to define the practices that are most appropriate to their regional context. Measures which fit better to local conditions will deliver better for environment and climate," said Hogan.

The paper itself noted that although greenhouse gas emissions in the agriculture sector have reduced by 24 percent since 1990, the sector needed to "step up" its contribution to limit climate change.

It said that "in the absence of stronger and more ambitious policy support it is unlikely that EU agricultural emissions will continue to decrease at the same pace".

National plans

To ensure that the national implementation of EU policies deliver the desired goals, member states will be required to send the commission 'strategic plans', which the EU executive would then have to "assess and approve".

Hogan noted that the commission has "a lot of experience in the to-ing and fro-ing" with member states on rural development programmes, and said that governments will have "about eighteen months" to discuss the plans with the commission.

According to the paper, member states will have to define "quantified targets" to make sure that the EU-level environmental and climate goals are reached.

The new policy should also give national governments flexibility on how they attract young farmers to take over agriculture businesses for the next generation.

Wednesday's paper itself is non-binding and not accompanied by legislative proposals. These will follow next year.

Disappointed environmentalists

However, the paper was still highly anticipated among interest groups - and in some cases met with disappointment.

Environmental lobby group WWF Europe expressed in a press release disappointment in the lack of clear targets in the paper.

The group said "the future legislative proposal will have to define legally-binding targets to ensure accountability at national level and avoid the misuse of 'flexibility' that we have seen in the past."

Their colleagues from Greenpeace also criticised the lack of concrete plans, and that it failed to mention that changing diets can have an effect on reducing agriculture's impact the climate.

"The industrial production and overconsumption of meat, milk and eggs in Europe is having a devastating impact on our health, nature and the climate," said Greenpeace.

"The commission's failure to even mention the problem shows the EU is asleep at the wheel while our food and farming system heads straight for disaster," it said.

Budget

The communication said nothing about how the CAP will be funded after 2020 because this is something that needs to be discussed through a separate procedure.

Discussions on the next multi-annnual EU budget, which will start next year, will focus on new priorities like security and migration policies, while the amount of money available is likely to shrink due to the UK exit from the EU.

"I am under strict instructions by the budget commissioner not to mention anything about money in the context of my communication, not to anticipate the multi-annual financial framework," said Hogan.

Visual Data

EU farming policy: The damage done by 20 years of inertia

The EU Commission will ask the public later this week how the common agricultural policy should be overhauled. Data from the past two decades reveals a catalogue of missed chances and failed reforms.

Meat 'taboo' debated at Bonn climate summit

Animal agriculture is responsible for a significant share of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, but until recently it 'was an issue that was really brushed under the carpet'.

Opinion

Eurozone needs institutional reform

Both the examples of Greece and Italy test the limits of a system with inherent weaknesses that feeds internal gaps, strengthens deficits and debts in the European South, and surpluses in the European North respectively.

Opinion

Europe could lose out in North Korean bonanza

South Korean businesses including Hyundai and Samsung are already scoping investment opportunities. Will North Korea become a 'new Vietnam' opportunity - or more like Myanmar, where slow Brussels policy-making meant EU exporters lost out.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Mission of China to the EUJointly Building Belt and Road Initiative Leads to a Better Future for All
  2. Macedonian Human Rights MovementMHRMI Launches Lawsuits Against Individuals and Countries Involved in Changing Macedonia's Name
  3. IPHRCivil society asks PACE to appoint Rapporteur to probe issue of political prisoners in Azerbaijan
  4. ACCASocial Mobility – How Can We Increase Opportunities Through Training and Education?
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEnergy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow
  6. UNICEFWhat Kind of Europe Do Children Want? Unicef & Eurochild Launch Survey on the Europe Kids Want
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Countries Take a Stand for Climate-Smart Energy Solutions
  8. Mission of China to the EUChina: Work Together for a Better Globalisation
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordics Could Be First Carbon-Negative Region in World
  10. European Federation of Allergy and AirwaysLife Is Possible for Patients with Severe Asthma
  11. PKEE - Polish Energy AssociationCommon-Sense Approach Needed for EU Energy Reform
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region to Lead in Developing and Rolling Out 5G Network

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Economic and Trade Relations Enjoy a Bright Future
  2. ACCAEmpowering Businesses to Engage with Sustainable Finance and the SDGs
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersCooperation in Nordic Electricity Market Considered World Class Model
  4. FIFAGreen Stadiums at the 2018 Fifa World Cup
  5. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Work Together to Promote Sustainable Development
  6. Counter BalanceEuropean Ombudsman Requests More Lending Transparency from European Investment Bank
  7. FIFARecycling at the FIFA World Cup in Russia
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersOECD Report: Gender Equality Boosts GDP Growth in Nordic Region
  9. Centre Maurits Coppieters“Peace and Reconciliation Is a Process That Takes Decades” Dr. Anthony Soares on #Brexit and Northern Ireland
  10. Mission of China to the EUMEPs Positive on China’s New Measures of Opening Up
  11. Macedonian Human Rights MovementOld White Men are Destroying Macedonia by Romanticizing Greece
  12. Counter BalanceControversial EIB-Backed Project Under Fire at European Parliament

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us