Wednesday

11th Dec 2019

Slovenians see price hikes after euro arrival

The Slovenian Consumers' Association has warned that a wide range of price increases have been registered across the country, as businesses opened and began trading in euros on Wednesday (3 January) on the first working day of the New Year.

Slovenia joined the eurozone on 1 January replacing its 15 year-old tolar with the euro. One euro equals 239.64 tolars.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 30-day free trial.

... or join as a group

  • Cafe in Ljublana: price hikes have mainly hit the capital (Photo: European Commission)

"Prices of coffee, tea, lunches or breakfasts are increasing all over Slovenia," Breda Kutin from the association told Slovenian state radio, according to AFP.

She added that the association had so far received more than 500 reports from consumers complaining about price increases in restaurants and coffee shops all over the country.

"The increase of prices is not a good long-term move since the changeover did not increase the revenues of citizens," Ms Kutin explained.

The consumers' association has published a list of retailers who have already raised prices and has advised customers to avoid them, according to AFX.

The around 2 million Slovenes have a two-week dual circulation period before all payments in Slovenia will from 15 January run in euros only.

Citizens will still be able to change tolar bills and coins into euros in all the banks.

"The euro cash changeover is proceeding well and fully according to plan," the European Central Bank said in a statement on Wednesday, referring to the overall introduction of the EU currency in Slovenia.

A recent EU survey showed two-thirds of Slovenes are happy to adopt the new currency, seeing it as a final step in becoming a part of the European mainstream.

The Alpine state is the first country of the new member states which joined the EU in 2004 to also enter the eurozone.

Feature

Promises and doubts: Africa's free-trade adventure

The EU is hoping that a continent-wide free trade agreement in Africa will help lift millions out of poverty and help solve issues of security and migration. But its message of values and equal partnership do not resonate with everyone.

Interview

EU Africa envoy: Europe needs to look beyond migration

Europe's obsession with migration from Africa means it risks losing out the continent's potential when it comes to trade, says the EU's ambassador to the African Union, Ranier Sabatucci. "Africa is a growing continent, it is the future," he says.

EU agrees 2020 budget deal

EU governments and the parliament agreed in marathon talks ino next year's budget - which will boost spending on climate, border protection, and the European satellite system. It will also be a benchmark if there is no long-term budget deal.

EU and China agree to defend 'gastronomic jewels'

Manchego cheese, Panjin rice and Polish vodka will all be protected under a new EU-China agreeement. But the two trading giants continue to struggle over other trade-related deals.

News in Brief

  1. Czechs protest against PM Babis over EU subsidy 'fraud'
  2. EU disbursed €2.7bn for Turkey refugees
  3. UK ports set to host EU border checks for Northern Ireland
  4. EU puts tech giants in crosshairs
  5. Faroe Islands under pressure to chose Huawei
  6. Hungary asked to apologise after council leak
  7. MEPs: Finnish budget proposal 'impossible to implement'
  8. EP committee supports 'Future of EU Conference'

Feature

Promises and doubts: Africa's free-trade adventure

The EU is hoping that a continent-wide free trade agreement in Africa will help lift millions out of poverty and help solve issues of security and migration. But its message of values and equal partnership do not resonate with everyone.

Opinion

Why von der Leyen must put rights at core of business

Ursula von der Leyen's in-tray must include those European executives on trial for systematic workplace harassment, the break-up of European slavery rings, and allegations of European companies' abuse in palm oil, including child labour, land grabs, and deforestation.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Climate Action Weeks in December
  5. UNESDAUNESDA welcomes Nicholas Hodac as new Director General
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersBrussels welcomes Nordic culture

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us