Tuesday

18th Feb 2020

MEPs defend budget increase in time of austerity

  • MEPs made the call during a plenary session in the Strasbourg hemicycle (Photo: European Parliament)

MEPs have voted by a vast majority to increase next year's EU budget by 5.9 percent, a move they define as "responsible" despite government spending cuts in member states.

The increase on the 2010 budget is marginally lower than the one initially proposed by the European Commission earlier this year, but substantially higher than the 2.9 percent supported by a majority of member states.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or join as a group

"The European Parliament has acted with a great sense of responsibility," said European Parliament President Jerzy Buzek on Wednesday (20 October) after the legislature refrained from pushing the commission's figure upwards, as is usually the case.

The 2011 EU budget proposed by MEPs would include €142.65 billion in commitments and €130.14 billion in payments. The negotiations are the first to take place under the new Lisbon Treaty format, handing parliament a greater say and allowing for only one reading.

From 27 October, member state and parliament negotiators will have three weeks to agree a joint text, with the issue set to feature prominently on the agenda of an EU leaders' summit in Brussels next week (28-29 October). Failure to do so would result in the continuation of the 2010 budget and likely disruption.

Sidonia Jedrzejewska, the MEP charged with steering the draft budget through parliament, said a smaller spending pot made no sense, especially at a time when the EU was being asked to do more under the Lisbon Treaty.

"The budget of the EU is not similar to a national budget, it is oriented towards investment and is a tool for fighting the crisis. I hope we will have an open and direct dialog with the Council [representing member states]," she said after the vote.

Conservative MEPs have slammed the called-for increase as outrageous under the current economic environment.

"We could argue that increasing the EU budget is naked short-term populism, but I doubt it is that popular in many countries," said Hungarian centre-right MEP Lajos Bokros. "Increased quantity does not mean increased quality."

Apart from the requested budgetary increase, several other factors are to make for difficult talks with member states.

In a bid to stay within multi-annual guidelines, the euro-deputy proposal seeks spending reductions in an number of areas of importance to national capitals, including an experimental nuclear fusion project (Iter).

MEPs have also attempted to tie agreement of the 2011 budget to the opening of discussions on EU "own resources" in the future, a previously taboo subject broken by the commission earlier this week in its "budget review."

A number of member states have already come out against the commission's proposed list of potential EU self-funding mechanisms that includes an EU tax on aviation and an EU sales tax. Paris declared it was "utterly inappropriate," London said that it would refuse to consider any new tax, and Berlin similarly refused to consider any of the proposals.

MEPs have indicated however that starting talks on the own resources element is a "full part of the overall agreement on the 2011 budget."

Net payer countries push back on EU budget plans

As EU budget negotiations enter a nasty phase, EU council chief Charles Michel tries to please two divided groups of member states, but Austria's Sebastian Kurz has warned net payers cannot be pushed for more.

Feature

Promises and doubts: Africa's free-trade adventure

The EU is hoping that a continent-wide free trade agreement in Africa will help lift millions out of poverty and help solve issues of security and migration. But its message of values and equal partnership do not resonate with everyone.

Interview

EU Africa envoy: Europe needs to look beyond migration

Europe's obsession with migration from Africa means it risks losing out the continent's potential when it comes to trade, says the EU's ambassador to the African Union, Ranier Sabatucci. "Africa is a growing continent, it is the future," he says.

EU agrees 2020 budget deal

EU governments and the parliament agreed in marathon talks ino next year's budget - which will boost spending on climate, border protection, and the European satellite system. It will also be a benchmark if there is no long-term budget deal.

Vietnam sent champagne to MEPs ahead of trade vote

A trade deal with Vietnam sailed through the European Parliament's international trade committee and after its embassy sent MEPs bottles of Moet & Chandon Imperial champagne over Christmas.

Feature

Promises and doubts: Africa's free-trade adventure

The EU is hoping that a continent-wide free trade agreement in Africa will help lift millions out of poverty and help solve issues of security and migration. But its message of values and equal partnership do not resonate with everyone.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersScottish parliament seeks closer collaboration with the Nordic Council
  2. UNESDAFrom Linear to Circular – check out UNESDA's new blog
  3. Nordic Council of Ministers40 years of experience have proven its point: Sustainable financing actually works
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Baltic ministers paving the way for 5G in the region
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Climate Action Weeks in December

Latest News

  1. Ending shell companies does not threaten privacy
  2. Net payer countries push back on EU budget plans
  3. Is Belgium heading for new elections?
  4. Budget, Zuckerberg, Pelosi and Cayman Islands This WEEK
  5. EU plan on AI: new rules, better taxes
  6. What the EU can do for South Sudan - right now
  7. The last best chance for Donbas and peace in Europe?
  8. EU commissioner lobbied by energy firm he owns shares in

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us