Monday

21st Jun 2021

Financial crisis slowing enlargement, Prague warns

  • Enlargement day 1 May 2004 in Brussels (Photo: European Commission)

Despite "fatigue" setting in amongst EU member states as a result of the ongoing economic crisis, the process of enlargement of the bloc should not be neglected, the Czech deputy prime minister, Alexandr Vondra, said on Wednesday (18 February).

"Yes, there is an enlargement fatigue among some member states ...Of course, you know, everybody is now concentrating on the crisis," Mr Vondra, whose country currently chairs the EU, said at a conference organised by the Brussels-based European Policy Centre think-tank.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"Still, it is our responsibility and it is of strategic importance to keep the process somehow moving, because otherwise [we would be] sending bad signals."

Enlargement is among the priorities the Czech EU presidency – to run until the end of June – has put on its agenda.

But the pace of the process has slowed down in recent months as several other issues, most notably the global financial crisis, attract much of the EU's attention.

Additionally, some candidate countries face blockages due to political disputes with individual EU states.

The border dispute between Slovenia and Croatia, which provoked Ljubljana to block the opening or closing of 11 chapters from Croatia's EU accession negotiations package in December, is only the most recent such dust-up.

"I think we should do our best to fix the problem and thus to continue and finalise the accession process [of Croatia]," Mr Vondra said, stressing that Prague was "in full support" of the European Commission idea to set up a mediation group to help solve the border issue.

"In general, Croatia is a country that belongs to the community - I go there almost every summer," he added. "It has a strategic value."

Enlargement is good for you

Meanwhile, the European Commission will on Friday publish a detailed report on the benefits of the EU's two latest enlargements - in 2004 and 2007 - taking in a total of 12 member states.

"The new member states - through their sheer number and dynamism - have made the EU stronger and culturally richer. The enlargement process has helped build and consolidate democracy after the demise of the Communist regimes," reads a draft commission communication on the issue.

"It has strengthened European security ...It has greatly boosted the economies ...[and] strengthened the economy of the union as a whole, through the advantages of integration in a larger internal market," continues the paper, seen by EUobserver.

The document lists economic benefits such as income and trade growth, as well as job creation levels of around 1 to 1.5 percent per year since 2004 in both the old and new member states.

"Five years on, the EU is better positioned to face increased global competition and to take a leading role in the world economy and its governance," it concludes, while also stressing that "full integration of national economies and income convergence" has still to be achieved.

For its part, the Czech Republic - one of the 10 countries that joined the EU on 1 May 2004 - is organising a conference in Prague on 2 March "to show in time of troubles how enlargement has contributed to the well-being" of both "old and new" EU member states, Mr Vondra said.

Interview

Does North Macedonia really exist?

Its language and history give North Macedonia its identity for president Stevo Pendarovski, but, for Bulgaria, neither of them are real, in a dispute holding up EU enlargement.

Spain to recognise Kosovo if it gets Serbia deal

Spain would be prepared to recognise Kosovo if it clinched a deal with Serbia, Madrid has said, in the first positive signal of its kind since EU-brokered talks resumed.

Kosovo to restart EU/US-led Serbia talks

Restarting talks on Serbia relations will be the new Kosovo prime minister's top priority, he said, but will the EU or the US lead the process?

Opinion

Montenegro's membership can inspire the European Dream

Today (15 December) I come to Brussels with a simple purpose: to present the credentials of my country, Montenegro, to become the next member state of the European Union, writes prime minister Zdravko Krivokapic.

Interview

Does North Macedonia really exist?

Its language and history give North Macedonia its identity for president Stevo Pendarovski, but, for Bulgaria, neither of them are real, in a dispute holding up EU enlargement.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. Too soon to lift EU sanctions on Burundi, NGOs warn
  2. EU to wage economic war on Belarus dictator
  3. EU commission takes stand against Danish asylum law
  4. Air pollution in many EU cities 'stubbornly high'
  5. EU leaders discuss Turkey, Russia, migration This WEEK
  6. Pandemic exposed corruption in some EU health systems
  7. The European Court of Justice vs German Constitutional Court
  8. AstraZeneca must deliver 50m doses by September or face fines

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us