Wednesday

29th Jun 2022

Cocaine use regular in MEPs' toilets

  • Wipes were labelled with the building name, the storey and a room number (Photo: EUobserver)

Systematic controls of 46 toilets in the European Parliament have revealed traces of cocaine, according to German TV magazine AKTE 05 - five years after the same reporters found cocaine traces in the German parliament.

The quantities found in MEPs' toilets imply regular use, according to the German TV show revealing the findings last night (14 July).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"Some of the quantities found there would have caused a police drug dog to respond", said pharmacologist Professor Fritz Sorgel from the Institute for Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Research in Nuremberg (IBMP), who analysed the samples.

In total, 41 of the 46 surface swabs taken at European Parliament buildings A to H in Brussels contained traces of the highly-addictive drug.

In one room the concentration was so high that there was only one possible explanation - cocaine had been consumed there just before the sample was taken.

"I’m sure a systematic control would unveil cocaine everywhere", said Professor Sorgel to Spiegel Online.

"Therefore I’m not at all surprised cocaine has been found in the European Parliament".

Producer and moderator of AKTE 05 Ulrich Meyer said that consumption of cocaine is a problem which pervades all of society, a problem that is "bigger than many politicians are willing to believe".

"We do not wish to point our fingers at any individuals or professional groups", he said, pointing out that the vast and complex European Parliament building is widely accessible to outside visitors.

EU opens door to Ukraine in 'geopolitical' summit

EU leaders will also discuss eurozone issues with European Central Bank president Christine Lagarde, as more and more leaders are worried about voters' distress at soaring inflation.

EU parliament revokes Russian lobbyist badges

After months of stalled negotiations to remove Russian lobbyists from the EU's joint-transparency register, the European Parliament has decided to go solo and unilaterally bar them from its premises.

Opinion

The euro — who's next?

Bulgaria's target date for joining the eurozone, 1 January 2024, seems elusive. The collapse of Kiril Petkov's government, likely fresh elections, with populists trying to score cheap points against the 'diktat of the eurocrats', might well delay accession.

News in Brief

  1. Bulgaria expels 70 alleged Russian spies
  2. EU Commission told to improve CAP data analytics
  3. Scotland pushes for second independence vote in 2023
  4. Climate groups: G7 leaders 'backsliding' on climate
  5. Ukraine diplomat urges German MEPs to reject EU taxonomy
  6. EU asylum requests were climbing before Ukraine war
  7. Public sector journalists protest Macron tax plan
  8. EU engine ban splits Germany's coalition

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  2. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  4. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022
  5. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBHow price increases affect construction workers
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic think tank examines influence of tech giants

Latest News

  1. EU ministers sign off on climate laws amid German infighting
  2. EU presidency still looking for asylum relocation pledges
  3. Finland and Sweden to join Nato, as Erdoğan drops veto
  4. The euro — who's next?
  5. One rubicon after another
  6. Green crime-fighting boss urgently required, key MEP says
  7. G7 leaders want price cap on Russian oil
  8. Western public has 'moral' duty to Ukraine, Nato chief says

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us