Friday

30th Sep 2016

Letter

EUobserver gives one-sided view of Azerbaijan

  • South Caucasus map (Photo: lib.utexas.edu)

I would like to take issue with EUobserver over two articles by Andrew Rettman entitled "Accidental war waiting to happen on EU periphery" on 14 May and "Azerbaijani lobbyists target EU opinion" on 24 May.

When writing about Nagorno-Karabakh, I would have thought it wise to mention that the regions that you refer to as "disputed territory" are in fact acknowledged by the UN Security Council, the EU and Nato as being Azerbaijani territory.

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I also find it strange that you do not refer to the fate of the 875,000 Azerbaijani refugees and internally displaced persons forced from their home during the conflict. I find it extraordinary that you choose to ignore the fate of these people.

I suspect that the one-sided view of the conflict and the region, as well as the interest in Azerbaijani groups, may be explained by EUobserver's links with the European Friends of Armenia (EuFoA).

Andrew Rettman between 4 and 8 May visited Armenia to observe the elections and meet officials, with the support of EuFoA.

I am confident that the information contained in these articles are an attempt by them to deflect and 'push-back' against Azerbaijan's engagement in Brussels.

Please reassure me that this is not the case, and publish this letter.

The writer is a spokesman for The European Azerbaijan Society

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