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30th Jun 2022

Poland says No to migrants after Brussels attack

Polish prime minister Beata Szydlo has said the Brussels attacks mean that Poland cannot take part in the EU’s migrant relocation scheme.

"Twenty eight EU countries agreed to solve the issue through relocation. But I will say it very clearly: I do not see it possible to allow migrants in Poland at the moment," Szydlo told the Superstacja TV broadcaster on Wednesday (23 March).

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  • Avramopoulos on Wednesday: "Those people who arrived on our shores are fleeing the same terror that struck in the heart of Europe" (Photo: European Commission)

She criticised German chancellor Angela Merkel for having “invited migrants to Europe.”

“This carefree attitude led to the problems that we have today,” she said.

“We cannot agree that thousands of migrants, who come to improve their lives, flow into Europe. There are also terrorists among them.”

Earlier on Wednesday, she told a meeting of NGO leaders at her chancellery in Warsaw that the Brussels attacks meant the EU had lost control of the migration crisis.

“Europe is incapable of dealing with this enormous crisis,” she said.

“When on Friday [18 March] the [EU] summit was coming to an end, European leaders went back to their capitals feeling that they had a good compromise, that they had found a solution to the crisis becaue they managed to conclude a deal with Turkey,” she said.

“A few days went by, and suddenly the terrorists made a joke out of the deal and showed Europe that further declarations, further documents, further hours-long talks don’t mean very much.”

Poland’s previous government had agreed to relocate up to 6,500 refugees from Greece and Italy in a mandatory quota system created by the European Commission.

Last week’s EU-Turkey deal is to see Turkey take back irregular migrants from Greece in return for EU states volunteering to resettle Syrian refugees from Turkey on a one-for-one basis.

Face saver

An EU source told EUobserver that Warsaw is not expected to take formal steps against the relocation scheme.

“They’re hoping that it falls apart by itself and that they can take part in the resettlement project instead, allowing everybody to save face,” the source said.

“The fact is that even though central European states have spoken out against the quotas, it’s the large, older member states who are doing almost nothing to implement them. That’s where the real problem lies.”

Leaders in central Europe have been making the link between refugees and terrorists since last summer.

They highlighted the fact that some of the Paris attackers entered the EU on fake papers via Turkey and Greece.

Turkey has also said it found nine would-be suicide bombers in a group of 7,000 Syrians who crossed the border in February.

But the EU commissioner in charge of migration, Dimitris Avramopoulos, on Wednesday in Brussels warned against “confusion” of the two issues.

“We are at the peak of two crises - security and migration - and while they overlap in timing they should not be confused. Those people who arrived on our shores are fleeing precisely the same terror that struck in the heart of Europe,” he said.

“To antagonise those seeking protection would be giving in to the hatred ... that terrorists try to sow,” he added.

Fear

Speaking to EUobserver in Prague before the Brussels attacks, Simon Panek, the head of People in Need, a Czech NGO, said people in central Europe “fear” migrants because few of them have ever met an Arab.

He said populist media and politicians reinforced the bad feeling.

People in Need works on the front lines of the Syrian war. Operating out of Turkey, it has spent €20 million on feeding 200,000 people deep inside Syria.

Panek said some NGOs have taken Syrian refugees to meet people in provincial Czech towns.

“When local people meet Syrian families and they hear their stories they’re open-minded and helpful,” he said.

“Fear is a very strong emotion,” he added. “You can destroy love in one day. But it’s much harder to deconstruct fear with rational debate.”

Smuggled migrants to leave Greece from Sunday onward

EU-Turkey accord to see rejected asylum applicants sent back to Turkey and an equal number of Syrian refugees to be resettled in the EU. Much will depend on Greece's capacity to deliver.

EU border agency highlights terrorist threat

Frontex, the EU border control agency, has called for more access to security data after warning that terrorists could use the migratory route to infiltrate Europe.

Opinion

Romania — latest EU hotspot in backlash against LGBT rights

Romania isn't the only country portraying lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people as a threat to children. From Poland and Hungary in EU, to reactionary movements around the world are prohibiting portrayals of LGBT people and families in schools.

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