Monday

20th Feb 2017

Agenda

This WEEK in the European Union

  • Estonia suffered a large-scale cyber attack in 2007 (Photo: UK Ministry of Defence)

The European Commission will on Wednesday (28 March) unveil plans for the setting up of a European cybercrime centre meant to identify the most dangerous cyber threats as well as support member states work in the area and help train national officials.

Brussels has been slow off the mark in tackling cyber crime as it struggles to keep up with a fast-changing online world. It was prompted to think properly about the issue by the large-scale cyber attack against Estonia in 2007. Last year the EU's own diplomatic service was subject to a large denial-of-service attack. Experts say a dedicated cybercrime centre is long overdue.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The commission's recent suggestion that member states will save themselves billions of euros in EU budget contributions if they introduce a tax on financial transactions (FTT) will get its first airing on Monday.

EU ministers are due to discuss the Union's next multi-annual budget (2014-2020) with the Danish EU presidency hoping to make good progress on talks by the end of its presidency. The EU commission wants all member states to agree to introducing an FTT (with two-thirds of the revenue to go to Brussels) to give it some more spending powers. But the idea - unveiled last Thursday - is divisive. It was immediately shot down by the UK. Sweden, the Netherlands, Cyprus and Malta also strongly oppose the tax.

The controversial issue of giving European passenger details to US authorities so they can check for potential security threats will surface once again in the parliament. The civil liberties committee is due to vote on the deal on Tuesday - with the MEP in charge of the dossier, Dutch liberal Sophie In 't Veld recommending that deputies reject it.

Deputies in the trade committee will on Tuesday discuss the global anti-counterfeit treaty Acta. The agreement - designed to protect intellectual property rights but seen by critics as infringing on privacy - is currently before the EU court to see if it breaches any EU laws. The commission took the legal path after mass anti-Acta protests prompted several member states to suspend ratification of the deal. The parliament, recently handed a global 2-million anti-Acta petition, has the right to reject the agreement.

At the end of the week, a clause in the EU treaty allowing citizens to potentially have some influence on policy making goes into effect.

Under the article, one million signatures from at least seven countries on an issue that is not frivolous or offensive, and within the commission's powers, obliges the EU executive to consider law-making in the area. The ideas are already stockpiling up. One of the first off the mark is likely to be an initiative calling on the commission to never privatise water.

Focus

EU commission admits mistake on Acta

The European Commission has admitted that it was taken aback by the scale of popular opposition to the global anti-counterfeit treaty, Acta.

First citizens' petition set to be on water

There is just over a week to go until the EU makes its long-awaited foray into the world of participatory democracy. The first formal attempt is likely to centre around securing a promise from Brussels to never privatise water.

This WEEK in the European Union

The EU will on Thursday unveil its masterplan on how to get Europe back to work and increase economic growth.

MEPs vote on EU-Canada deal This WEEK

MEPs will have a final vote on the EU-Canada trade deal, while Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau will address the European Parliament in Strasbourg this week.

News in Brief

  1. Migrants storm Spanish enclave of Ceuta
  2. Spain's princess fined for tax fraud, husband sentenced
  3. EU to invest millions in energy infrastructure
  4. Dutch data watchdog forces online vote aides to up security
  5. EU allows Lithuania to ban Russian tv channel
  6. Finland announces increase in defence spending
  7. Ex-PM Blair says Brits should 'rise up' against Brexit
  8. Nato chief says facts to prevail over fake news

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Malta EU 2017End of Roaming Fees: Council Reaches Agreement on Wholesale Caps
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Help Startups Access US Market
  3. Centre Maurits CoppietersMinorities and Migrations
  4. Salzburg Global SeminarThe Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play
  5. UNICEFNumber of Ukrainian Children Needing Aid Nearly Doubles to 1 Million Over the Past Year
  6. Centre Maurits CoppietersThe Situation of Refugee Women in Europe
  7. Salzburg Global SeminarToward a Shared Culture of Health: Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship
  8. European Free AllianceAustria Should Preserve & Promote Bilingual and Multinational Carinthia
  9. Martens CentreShow Your Love for Democracy! Take Part in Our Contest: "If It's Broken, Let's Fix It"
  10. CISPECloud Computing Leaders Establish Data Protection Standards to Protect Customer Data
  11. Malta EU 2017Landmark Deal Reached With European Parliament on Portability of Online Content
  12. Belgrade Security ForumBSF 2017: Building a Common Future in the Age of Uncertainty