Friday

23rd Feb 2018

Agenda

This WEEK in the European Union

  • Estonia suffered a large-scale cyber attack in 2007 (Photo: UK Ministry of Defence)

The European Commission will on Wednesday (28 March) unveil plans for the setting up of a European cybercrime centre meant to identify the most dangerous cyber threats as well as support member states work in the area and help train national officials.

Brussels has been slow off the mark in tackling cyber crime as it struggles to keep up with a fast-changing online world. It was prompted to think properly about the issue by the large-scale cyber attack against Estonia in 2007. Last year the EU's own diplomatic service was subject to a large denial-of-service attack. Experts say a dedicated cybercrime centre is long overdue.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The commission's recent suggestion that member states will save themselves billions of euros in EU budget contributions if they introduce a tax on financial transactions (FTT) will get its first airing on Monday.

EU ministers are due to discuss the Union's next multi-annual budget (2014-2020) with the Danish EU presidency hoping to make good progress on talks by the end of its presidency. The EU commission wants all member states to agree to introducing an FTT (with two-thirds of the revenue to go to Brussels) to give it some more spending powers. But the idea - unveiled last Thursday - is divisive. It was immediately shot down by the UK. Sweden, the Netherlands, Cyprus and Malta also strongly oppose the tax.

The controversial issue of giving European passenger details to US authorities so they can check for potential security threats will surface once again in the parliament. The civil liberties committee is due to vote on the deal on Tuesday - with the MEP in charge of the dossier, Dutch liberal Sophie In 't Veld recommending that deputies reject it.

Deputies in the trade committee will on Tuesday discuss the global anti-counterfeit treaty Acta. The agreement - designed to protect intellectual property rights but seen by critics as infringing on privacy - is currently before the EU court to see if it breaches any EU laws. The commission took the legal path after mass anti-Acta protests prompted several member states to suspend ratification of the deal. The parliament, recently handed a global 2-million anti-Acta petition, has the right to reject the agreement.

At the end of the week, a clause in the EU treaty allowing citizens to potentially have some influence on policy making goes into effect.

Under the article, one million signatures from at least seven countries on an issue that is not frivolous or offensive, and within the commission's powers, obliges the EU executive to consider law-making in the area. The ideas are already stockpiling up. One of the first off the mark is likely to be an initiative calling on the commission to never privatise water.

Focus

EU commission admits mistake on Acta

The European Commission has admitted that it was taken aback by the scale of popular opposition to the global anti-counterfeit treaty, Acta.

First citizens' petition set to be on water

There is just over a week to go until the EU makes its long-awaited foray into the world of participatory democracy. The first formal attempt is likely to centre around securing a promise from Brussels to never privatise water.

This WEEK in the European Union

The EU will on Thursday unveil its masterplan on how to get Europe back to work and increase economic growth.

ECB, Budget, EU elections This WEEK

EU leaders will gather to begin talking about the 2019 election process and the post-2020 budget, while eurozone finance ministers will ponder choosing the next European Central Bank deputy chief.

News in Brief

  1. Report: EU to increase sanctions on Myanmar
  2. Juncker 'worried' by Italian elections
  3. EU migration to UK at lowest since 2012
  4. MEP Andrieu will chair parliament pesticide committee
  5. Juncker's right-hand man warns of 'institutional blockage'
  6. Greek parliament to open probe on PMs and EU commissioner
  7. May gathers Brexit ministers to hammer out UK position
  8. Tajani asks Juncker for all EMA Brexit relocation documents

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EPSUMovie Premiere: 'Up to The Last Drop' - 22 February, Brussels
  2. Aid & Trade LondonJoin Thousands of Stakeholders of the Global Aid Industry at Aid & Trade London
  3. Macedonian Human Rights Movement Int.European Free Alliance Joins MHRMI to End the Anti-Macedonian Name Negotiations
  4. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Tourism Year to Promote Business and Mutual Ties
  5. European Jewish CongressAt “An End to Antisemitism!” Conference, Dr. Kantor Calls for Ambitious Solutions
  6. UNESDAA Year Ago UNESDA Members Pledged to Reduce Added Sugars in Soft Drinks by 10%
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsUzbekistan: Investigate Torture of Journalist
  8. CESICESI@Noon on ‘Digitalisation & Future of Work: Social Protection For All?’ - March 7
  9. UNICEFExecutive Director's Committment to Tackling Sexual Exploitation and Abuse of Children
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region 2018: Facts, Figures and Rankings of the 74 Regions
  11. Mission of China to the EUDigital Economy Shaping China's Future, Over 30% of GDP
  12. Macedonian Human Rights Movement Int.Suing the Governments of Macedonia and Greece for Changing Macedonia's Name

Latest News

  1. EU leaders to kick off post-Brexit budget debate
  2. Greek government's steady steps to exit bailout programme
  3. Frontex: Europe's new law enforcement agency?
  4. Poland and Greece broke EU environment laws, rules court
  5. Dutch MPs vote on ending 'Ukraine-type' referendums
  6. Corruption report: Hungary gets worse, Italy makes progress
  7. UK seeks flexible transition length after Brexit
  8. Commission defence of Barroso meeting leaves 'discrepancies'