Thursday

23rd Feb 2017

Agenda

Ukraine, data protection, and troika in spotlight this WEEK

Ukraine, data protection, and the performance of the troika in bailout countries, are among the top subjects set for debate and vote at the Strasbourg plenary session this week.

MEPs on Monday evening (10 March) will discuss the EU’s €11 billion aid package to stabilise a post-revolution Ukraine with a vote set for Wednesday.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The money, proposed last week by European Commission president Jose Manuel Barroso, would come from the EU’s own budget and EU-based international financial institutions.

The package also calls for preferential access to the EU market for Ukrainian industries ahead of the proposed free trade deal.

Ukraine’s foreign minister Andriy Deshchytsya told Ukrainian 1+1 television on Sunday the free trade deal with the EU could be signed before the end of the month.

“The political association with the European Union could be signed on March 17 or 21,” he said, reports AFP.

Data protection, the civil liberty committee’s inquiry into the National Security Agency’s (NSA) collection of data, and money laundering, are set for debate on Tuesday.

The EU’s reformed data protection bill, which aims to overhaul the current patchwork of national legislation, will be voted on Wednesday.

The bill has been the target of intense industry lobbying. A handful of member states are stalling the bill’s adoption as they attempt to downgrade the regulation into a directive.

Meanwhile, MEPs are threatening to suspend data exchange deals with the US following the espionage disclosures by former US intelligence contractor Edward Snowden.

A resolution passed by the civil liberties committee recommends suspending the EU-US terrorist financial tracking programme (TFTP) until the Americans provide more detail into allegations they hacked the international wire transfer system, Swift.

They also want to suspend the EU-US Safe Harbour deal, which is designed to ensure that firms follow EU data protection laws when processing the personal data of EU citizens.

MEPs are set to vote on the resolution Wednesday.

German Green Jan Philipp Albrecht wants to re-table an amendment to the resolution, which calls upon member states to grant Snowden protection from prosecution and extradition to the US.

Both the centre-right EPP and centre-left S&D had blocked the amendment at the committee level.

Tuesday will also see MEPs vote on draft anti-money laundering rules.

MEPs included a provision in the draft law that would require the actual owners of companies and trusts to be listed in public registers in EU countries. Disclosure of ownership is said to make it more difficult for people to avoid paying taxes and launder money.

On Wednesday, MEPs will debate the performance of the troika of international lenders (European Commission, European Central Bank and International Monetary Fund) in bailout countries with a vote on Thursday.

The lenders have come under criticism over allegations of conflicts of interest and lack of democratic accountability for their activities in Greece, Portugal, Cyprus, and Ireland.

Russia sanctions to dominate this WEEK

Possible EU sanctions against Russia over Ukraine are set to dominate this week's agenda as leaders gather in Brussels to discuss the implications of the referendum in Crimea.

Banking union dominates final EP session This WEEK

Crucial laws for the EU's banking union will headline proceedings in Strasbourg this week as MEPs gather there for the parliament's final session before May's European elections.

Pence, Greece and Brexit This WEEK

The US vice-president becomes the first senior Trump administration official to visit EU institutions. Greece's creditors try to break deadlock in talks, and British Lords will debate Brexit.

MEPs vote on EU-Canada deal This WEEK

MEPs will have a final vote on the EU-Canada trade deal, while Canadian prime minister Justin Trudeau will address the European Parliament in Strasbourg this week.

News in Brief

  1. Report: Commission gauging EU support for Poland sanctions
  2. Irish PM expected to quit amid police scandal
  3. After Brexit vote, 100,000 UK firms registered in Ireland
  4. Bayrou to support Macron in French presidential election
  5. British by-election tests Ukip strength after Brexit
  6. Romanian parliament buries controversial corruption decree
  7. Dozens drown off Libyan coast
  8. EU ministers approve anti-tax avoidance directive

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. QS World MBA TourMeet with Leading International Business Schools in Paris on March 4th
  2. Malta EU 2017Economic Governance: Agreement Reached on Structural Reform Support Programme for Member States
  3. Socialists & DemocratsWomen Have to Work Ten Years Longer to Match Lifetime Earnings of Men
  4. Counter BalanceTrans-Adriatic Pipeline Is a Major Risk for Banks, Warns New Analysis
  5. Martens CentreEU and US Migration Policies Compared: Join the Debate on February 28th
  6. Swedish EnterprisesTechnology and Data Flows - Shaping the Society of Tomorrow
  7. UNICEFNearly 1.4 Million Children at Risk of Death as Famine Looms Across Africa and Yemen
  8. Malta EU 2017End of Roaming Fees: Council Reaches Agreement on Wholesale Caps
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Help Startups Access US Market
  10. Centre Maurits CoppietersMinorities and Migrations
  11. Salzburg Global SeminarThe Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play
  12. UNICEFNumber of Ukrainian Children Needing Aid Nearly Doubles to 1 Million Over the Past Year