Tuesday

21st Nov 2017

Catalonia still asking for independence

  • Half a million people gathered in Barcelona on Sunday for the Diada, the National Day of Catalonia (Photo: Reuters)

Hundreds of thousands of people gathered in Catalonia on Sunday (11 September) in a call for independence from Spain, amid efforts by local authorities to raise the region’s profile abroad and a domestic row over the budget.

According to local police around 850,000 people marched across five cities, including 540,000 in Barcelona to commemorate the fall of Barcelona and the subsequent loss of Catalan liberties, institutions and laws in the War of the Spanish Succession in 1714.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Organisers claim over a million participants, the Spanish government delegation in the region said they were 350,000.

Two civil society groups, National Catalan Assembly and Omnium, organised the gatherings under the slogan “Ready”. Most people were dressed up in either T-shirts bearing the slogan or with the Catalan independence flag tied around their shoulders.

Among them was Catalonia’s president Carles Puigdemont, the first regional leader to do so.

Speaking to journalists before the demonstration, he said he feared that Catalans “will never be listened to” by the authorities in Madrid.

He said he was “willing to accept any kind of result of a referendum, unlike Madrid”, and that a referendum would have had to be agreed to with the Spanish government.

The People's Party government in Madrid has ruled out any kind of referendum or consultation and has taken legal steps against move towards independence, saying that it is against the Spanish constitution.

The issue is still very contentious both in Spain and in the region itself. A recent poll suggested that 47 percent of Catalans are in favour of Catalonia becoming an independent state while 42 percent are against.

In the crowd Griselda Valverde and Adriana Pla, two students, told EUobserver they were there “because we want to promote the wish for independence”.

But others were less enthusiastic.

“I don’t like all this patriotism and showing of flags,” said 20-year-old student Miriam Vargas, who was not taking part in the demonstration. “I would like Catalonia to become independent but not if things continue as they are. I want Catalan politics to change as well.”

“I think this national day has been turned into a circus of independence,” Roberto Blanco a Barcelona taxi driver on duty said, adding that not all Catalans want independence.

Scottish example?

A St Andrew's Cross was also to be found among participants. Robert McNair celebrated his first Diada, as the celebration is called in Catalonia, with Catalan friends.

“These Catalans were there for the Scottish independence referendum and we are returning them the favour two years later,” said the 65 year-old Scot from the Glasgow area.

The British vote and Scotland’s warning that it could leave the UK after Brexit have been followed in Catalonia.

“Understandably, there are pro-independence Catalans who are excited about the prospect of a second Scottish independence referendum,” Daniel Cetrà, research fellow at the Centre on Constitutional Change at the University of Edinburgh, told EUobserver.

But he said events in Scotland were “unlikely to affect the evolution of the Catalan independence process, just like the 2012 Edinburgh Agreement [to organise the referendum] and the 2014 Scottish referendum did not have a significant effect”.

Edinburgh and Barcelona, he explained, are in two very different situations with the first risking being pulled out of the EU while the other has a political agenda that calls for the right to decide.

Not all agree though. “Clearly a Scottish secession could have an impact since it would show the viability of secession in Western Europe and within the European Union,” a Catalan academic, told EUobserver, asking not to be named because he doesn’t want to appear to take sides.

He said an agreement between Barcelona and Madrid that would give Catalonia full fiscal powers could be “an example of accommodation without secession”.

Since winning the Catalan election last year, the pro-independence Junts pel Si coalition (Together for Yes), and with the support of far-left Popular Unity Candidacy (CUP), has begun preparing legal steps for independence by designing a tax collection authority, a social security system and a foreign affairs department. The government in Madrid has protested against all of these steps.

Internationalising the cause

Another move, announced last week, will be to open four new Catalan delegations in EU countries, in Copenhagen, Geneva, Warsaw and Zagreb. They will work as a hub for the region of the Nordic countries; Switzerland and the international organisations; Poland and the Baltic region; and the Balkan region respectively.

A delegation was inaugurated in Lisbon last week, one year after it was approved by the region’s government.

Once opened, the four new delegations will eventually bring the number of unofficial Catalan embassies to 12. Delegations already exist in Brussels, Berlin, London, Paris, Vienna, Rome, Lisbon and in Washington.

“Catalonia should have a proper external representation suitable to what we are as a country and to the mission of this government,” Catalan foreign affairs minister Raul Romeva said at a press conference.

The move shows that “in the last four or five years it has become more important to internationalise the Catalan cause for independence”, Ferran Requejo professor of political science at the Pompeu Fabra University in Barcelona, told EUobserver.

“What they can actually do in these delegations is very restricted.”

Confidence vote

“They are very controlled by the Spanish authorities and have less room for manoeuvre than the delegations of, for example, Quebec or the Belgian regions,” he said.

Romeva himself also admitted in a radio interview on Thursday that “we are not a state, that is why our communication is often discreet”.

The opening of the new delegations, and of others planned outside Europe in the future, will have to be agreed in the 2017 budget.

But the Catalan parliament still has to approve the 2016 budget. Earlier this year, CUP – whose support is needed for a majority in the Parliament’s independence camp - decided not to back the regional spending plan because it did not support enough social and pro-secession programs.

Puigdemont has called for a confidence vote on 28 September. If he fails to get enough support, it could lead to the fourth election in the last six years.

Interview

Statehood is Catalonia's 'only option'

The new Catalan government wants independence from Spain, but it also wants to convince Europe it can be "an asset, not a problem", says its foreign minister Raul Romeva.

Catalonia separatists on EU charm offensive

Catalan authorities are trying to garner support from EU states and institutions, after nationalists swept to election victory on promise to hold independence referendum.

Catalan parliament backs independence vote

Lawmakers in Catalonia voted to set up a referendum for independence, next September, in defiance of Madrid and a recent constitutional court ruling.

Meat 'taboo' debated at Bonn climate summit

Animal agriculture is responsible for a significant share of the world's greenhouse gas emissions, but until recently it 'was an issue that was really brushed under the carpet'.

Analysis

Sicily: Renzi finds Achilles heel in boot of Italy

Elections in Sicily at the weekend saw Matteo Renzi's Democratic Party trounced into third place - can the one-time wonder kid of Italian politics bounce back in time for 2018's national election?

News in Brief

  1. European Banking Authority will move to Paris
  2. EU court threatens daily fine over Polish forest logging
  3. EU medicines agency will move to Milan or Amsterdam
  4. Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Milan in next round of EMA vote
  5. Three countries pull out of medicines agency Brexit race
  6. Schulz calls for new German elections
  7. EU Commission 'confident' on German stability
  8. EU adopts new border check rules

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Bio-Based IndustriesBio-Based Industries: European Growth is in Our Nature!
  2. Dialogue PlatformErdogan's Most Vulnerable Victims: Women and Children
  3. UNICEFEuropean Parliament Marks World Children's Day by Launching Dialogue With Children
  4. European Jewish CongressAntisemitism in Europe Today: Is It Still a Threat to Free and Open Society?
  5. Counter BalanceNew Report: Juncker Plan Backs Billions in Fossil Fuels and Carbon-Heavy Infrastructure
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic countries prioritise fossil fuel subsidy reform
  7. Mission of China to the EUNew era for China brings new opportunities to all
  8. ACCASmall and Medium Sized Practices Must 'Offer the Whole Package'
  9. UNICEFAhead of the African Union - EU Summit, Survey Highlights Impact of Conflict on Education
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council Calls for Closer Co-Operation on Foreign Policy
  11. Swedish EnterprisesTrilogue Negotiations - Striking the Balance Between Transparency and Efficiency
  12. Access EuropeProspects for US-EU Relations Under the Trump Administration - 28 November 2017

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable Growth the Nordic Way: Climate Solutions for a Sustainable Future
  2. EU2017EEHow Data Fuels Estonia's Economy
  3. Mission of China to the EUChina and EU Step Up Water Management Cooperation
  4. CECEMachinery Industry Calls for Joint EU Approach to Develop Digital Construction Sector
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersMale Business Leaders Gather in Copenhagen to Advance Gender Equality
  6. EnelNo ETS Deal Means It Can Still Be Strengthened
  7. EU2017EEEstonia Anticipates More Digital Cooperation With Sweden
  8. Mission of China to the EUChina Launches Campaign to Protect IPR of Foreign Companies
  9. European Jewish CongressEJC Condemns Attacks on Ruta Vanagaite and the Shredding of Her Books in Lithuania
  10. Bio-Based IndustriesDiscover the Future of the Bio-Based Economy. Register Now for the BBI Stakeholder Forum!
  11. European Free AllianceWelcome Catalonia!
  12. UNICEFGrowing Number of Unaccompanied Refugee Children in Greece in Need of Shelter