Sunday

19th Nov 2017

Focus

First EU cloud software set to go airborne

  • The EU's first cloud computing software is set to go online. (Photo: Jonathas Rodrigues)

The EU's first cloud computing project is ready for use, according to a statement on Tuesday (May 1st) by the EU-funded Optimis project. The scheme will make its first cloud software available from 1 June to be downloaded from the Optimis website.

The Optimis programme has been developed by IT-company Atos in conjunction with software experts from a string of European universities. Developers say it will allow online service providers and businesses the opportunity to build and run their own tailor-made cloud applications. In an attempt to take account of the European Commission's plans to re-write online data protection rules, Optimis technicians say that the software covers data protection requirements.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Csilla Zsigri, Optimis spokesman, said that the cloud technology programme would "stimulate new research and innovation, and the creation of pan-European partnerships to create better cloud environments and give European businesses, especially SMBs, a platform on which to innovate with new products and services."

Optimis was launched in June 2010 and supported by €10.5 million of EU funds. It is one of a series of pilot projects that form part of the EU cloud computing strategy. The strategy is being led by digital agenda commissioner Neelie Kroes in a bid to close the gap between the EU and US cloud markets.

In February, Kroes launched a separate €10 million pilot project between public sector organisations and the IT industry with a view to putting together common EU-rules for cloud procurement.

The EU executive body sees wide-use of cloud technology as a route to economic growth by slashing the administrative and data transfer costs faced by businesses. During her speech at the World Economic Forum in Switzerland this January - at which she unveiled the cloud procurement pilot - she insisted that cloud technology would "promise scalable, secure services for greater efficiency, greater flexibility, and lower cost."

The global market for cloud computing, where software and information is available on demand, has boomed in recent years, with the US cloud computing market worth an estimated $68 billion in 2011. Meanwhile, in January this year, French marketing giant Nexima claimed that the European cloud market was growing by 20 percent a year.

The Commission is also expected to put forward legislation later this summer aimed at harmonising data protection rules and technical standards for cloud computing.

Germany leads EU countries on cloud computing

Five EU countries rank among the world’s top ten for policies that promote cloud computing, according to a study published on Wednesday by an ICT body representing Microsoft and other international software giants.

New cloud strategy to reform EU online market

Digital agenda Commissioner Neelie Kroes has promised to present a European cloud strategy this summer, as part of a plan to reform the online market in the EU.

Pressure mounts on EU cloud deal as deadline looms

The European Commission is under pressure to keep to its self-imposed September deadline to publish an EU cloud computing strategy, as new evidence revealed widespread public confusion about it.

News in Brief

  1. Bonn climate talks extend into Friday evening
  2. UK needs to move on Brexit by early December, Tusk says
  3. Puigdemont extradition decision postponed to December
  4. Ireland wants written UK guarantees to avoid hard border
  5. US did not obstruct climate talks, says German minister
  6. EU signs social declaration
  7. Puigdemont to be heard by Belgian judges
  8. Steep fall in migrants reaching EU

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Jewish CongressAntisemitism in Europe Today: Is It Still a Threat to Free and Open Society?
  2. Counter BalanceNew Report: Juncker Plan Backs Billions in Fossil Fuels and Carbon-Heavy Infrastructure
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic countries prioritise fossil fuel subsidy reform
  4. Mission of China to the EUNew era for China brings new opportunities to all
  5. ACCASmall and Medium Sized Practices Must 'Offer the Whole Package'
  6. UNICEFAhead of the African Union - EU Summit, Survey Highlights Impact of Conflict on Education
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council Calls for Closer Co-Operation on Foreign Policy
  8. Swedish EnterprisesTrilogue Negotiations - Striking the Balance Between Transparency and Efficiency
  9. Access EuropeProspects for US-EU Relations Under the Trump Administration - 28 November 2017
  10. World Vision20 November: Exchange of Views at the EP on Children Affected by the Syria Crisis
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable Growth the Nordic Way: Climate Solutions for a Sustainable Future
  12. EU2017EEHow Data Fuels Estonia's Economy

Latest News

  1. EU keeps former Soviet states at arm's length
  2. EU leaders make pledge on social issues after populist backlash
  3. EU agencies and eastern neighbours This WEEK
  4. Germany slams Dutch call for more ambitious EU climate goal
  5. Mind the gap: inequality in our cities
  6. Climate activists 'disappointed' with EU at climate talks
  7. Davis outlines UK vision on Brexit in Berlin
  8. German coalition talks in near collapse