Monday

22nd Apr 2019

Katainen vague on €300bn investment plan

  • Katainen was the second commissioner to eat chocolate during the hearing (after Denmark's Vestagher) (Photo: European Parliament)

A parliamentary hearing of Finland's Jyrki Katainen, one of the seven vice-presidents in the new EU commission, has shed little light on where the money for a vaunted €300 billion investment plan will come from.

Incoming EU commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker has promised to raise €300 billion to be spent over the next three years in the 28 EU member states.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

He has put Katainen, vice-president for "jobs, growth, investment and competitiveness" in charge of this money-raising project.

Katainen was repeatedly asked by MEPs on Tuesday (7 October) where the new money would come from and how he will avoid it being wasted on not-needed bridges or airports.

"How can you persuade us that the €300 billion are not a 'mythical plan' that stays on paper or that it is simply redistribution of existing money?" one MEP asked.

Katainen, who is currently an economics commissioner after his predecessor Olli Rehn stepped down in June to take up an MEP seat, fielded the questions with smiles and composure.

He always called other commissioners by their first name, to dispel the impression that he will be their superior, even though Juncker appointed him as "team leader" over 18 commissioners.

Katainen said he will sit down with "Pierre and Jonathan" - the economics and financial services commissioners - once appointed and divide tasks and draw up a list of concrete projects to be funded.

He said his main three priorities will be "economic stability, public money for an "investment wave" where private money is not flowing, such as research, and, thirdly, energy and transport."

Katainen also said "surplus countries" - a reference to Germany - should spend more to help out the rest, while those who are still struggling with recession should concentrate their few resources on research and innovation.

His predecessor Olli Rehn, now an MEP in the trade committee, asked him how much of the €300 billion will be put into decreasing Europe's energy dependence on Russia.

Katainen listed a few projects, including one in Finland, and said interconnections and green energy were the answer.

He also described himself as "obsessed" with renewable energy, in reply to a question as to why green energy is not part of his portfolio or in the job description of any of the other six vice-presidents.

His own political family, the centre-right European People's Party, was quick to applaud his performance.

"The EPP Group is looking forward to working with Jyrki Katainen to set up the new European Investment Programme. He is our man for jobs and growth. Today he showed that he is well prepared for this extremely important job", said German MEP Burkhard Balz on behalf of the group.

But some MEPs remained unimpressed.

Katainen's performance was that of a "helpless schoolboy", said German MEP Bernd Lucke from the anti-euro Alternative fuer Deutschland party.

He criticised the Finn for not being able to say where the €300 billion would come from.

"If Katainen says EU funds should be spent more efficiently, then he obviously has no idea how much €300 billion are," Lucke said.

Slovene commission nominee to be sent home

MEPs are Wednesday to decide on the five commissioners who failed to get the green light after parliamentary hearings, with the Slovene nominee set for the axe.

Agenda

EU to unveil investment fund this WEEK

The unveiling of a highly anticipated investment fund, a censure vote, a decision on France's budget and the visit by the Pope to the European Parliament makes next week one of the busiest since the Juncker commission began.

Feature

Romania enlists priests to promote euro switchover plan

Romania is due to join the single currency in 2024 - despite currently only meeting one of the four criteria. Now the government in Bucharest is enlisting an unlikely ally to promote the euro to the public: the clergy.

Trump and Kurz: not best friends, after all

The visit of Austrian chancellor Sebastian Kurz to the White House on Wednesday showed that the current rift in transatlantic relations is deepening by the day.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  2. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  3. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  4. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  9. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  10. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  12. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan

Latest News

  1. Romania drafts EU code on NGO migrant rescues
  2. Bulgaria, Hungary, and Malta shamed on press unfreedom
  3. EU drafts $20bn US sanctions list in aviation dispute
  4. Brunei defends stoning to death of gay men in EU letter
  5. US Democrats side with Ireland on Brexit
  6. Wifi or 5G to connect EU cars? MEPs weigh in
  7. How Brexit may harm the new EU parliament
  8. EU parliament backs whistleblower law

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us