Saturday

16th Dec 2017

US remarks on Microsoft ruling 'unacceptable', says Kroes

  • "It is absolutely not on," says Ms Kroes (Photo: EUobserver)

EU competition commissioner Neelie Kroes has lashed out at the US government for having criticised an EU court ruling upholding the European Commission's 2004 anti-trust decision on Microsoft.

"It is totally unacceptable that a representative of the US administration criticises an independent court of law outside its jurisdiction," Ms Kroes told journalists at a separate press conference in Brussels on Wednesday (19 September).

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"It is absolutely not on. The European Commission does not pass judgement on rulings by US courts and we expect the same degree of respect from US authorities for rulings by EU courts."

The commissioner's unusually harsh comments came as a reaction to a statement by the US Justice Department's top antitrust official, Thomas Barnett.

"We are concerned that the standard applied to unilateral conduct by the [EU court], rather than helping consumers, may have the unfortunate consequence of harming consumers by chilling innovation and discouraging competition," he said on Monday (17 September).

The remark was sparked by a judgment made earlier in the day by the European Court of First Instance - the EU's second highest court – which upheld an EU decision to fine software giant Microsoft €497 million for abusing its dominant market position and to order the US-based company to share information on its programming systems.

Ms Kroes is set to visit the US in the coming weeks where the issue is likely to come up.

The last time the two regions exchanged harsh comments about anti-trust regulation was in 2001 when the EU executive blocked a merger between US firms General Electric Co. and Honeywell.

The then EU anti-trust commissioner Mario Monti brushed off criticism from US president George Bush and other top US officials who accused the EU of "protectionism".

Decision to block merger provokes outrage in US

The decision by the European Commission to block the merger between General Electric Co. and Honeywell has prompted harsh criticism by American President George Bush and other top US officials, including Treasury Secretary Paul O'Neill, according to CNN.

Microsoft case sets precedent, says Brussels

In a major victory for Brussels, an EU court has upheld a European Commission decision to fine software giant Microsoft €497 million for abusing its dominant market position.

Commissioner Monti seeks to heal rift over merger

Following the recent dispute between Europe and America over the blocking of the merger between General Electrics and Honeywell, officials on both sides of the Atlantic said they were scrambling to find out why the world's two great regulatory machines had come to such starkly different conclusions, writes the Telegraph.

Analysis

EU mulls post-Brexit balance of euro and non-eurozone states

Brexit will dramatically change the balance between EU members states that have the euro and those that don't. The thinking on the future of the eurozone is done at EU-27 level - but opposing camps will have to be reconciled.

Facebook to shift ad revenue away from Ireland

Public pressure about low corporate taxes appear to have pressured Facebook to launch plans to stop routing international ad sales through its Dublin-based headquarters in Ireland.

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