Friday

3rd Feb 2023

Austria to extend work ban for EU newcomers

Austria is to extend a ban for workers from new EU countries for another three years, with a possibility of applying a maximum transition period of seven years until 2011.

According to the Austrian economy minister Martin Bartenstein, who confirmed the postponement until 2009, the next decision will depend on his country’s employment situation, APA agency reported.

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Vienna is one of 12 West European capitals applying the allowed measures against the free movement of newcomers to their labour markets.

But while some countries – like Germany - announced right away that they would use the whole seven years period, Austria chose to evaluate its job situation gradually and move along the scheme agreed at the EU level (2-3-2 years of the transitional measures).

On the other hand, the UK, Ireland and Sweden have opened their borders to new member state workers, and have seen quite a significant increase of migrants from new member states.

Their numbers have been higher than expected by the respective governments, according to a recent report, but although they use the social benefits where possible, they tend to be temporary, so do not bring their family, and take jobs that others cannot or will not do.

The European Commission is set to launch a thorough review of the employment situation in the "old" EU countries next year, and plans to draw recommendations concerning the existing restrictions on its findings.

Fear of 'youth drain' from new member states

Some new member states are battling with a 'youth drain' as well-qualified young people leave for jobs in western Europe, but at the same time, the feared influx of workers to old member states has proven to be a myth, according to a new report.

EU lobby register still riddled with errors

The EU's lobby register remains riddled with errors, with pro-transparency campaigners demanding better data and mandatory rules. The latest findings come amid a raft of proposals by the European Parliament president to weed out corruption in the wake of Qatargate.

EU lobby register still riddled with errors

The EU's lobby register remains riddled with errors, with pro-transparency campaigners demanding better data and mandatory rules. The latest findings come amid a raft of proposals by the European Parliament president to weed out corruption in the wake of Qatargate.

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