Wednesday

16th Oct 2019

Egyptian protester: 'We are getting a bad image in Europe'

  • Handful of tourists in what should be a crowd-packed pyramid site in Cairo. Its bad image is costing it billions in lost income (Photo: EUobserver)

Tens of thousands of Egyptians marched in protest in Cairo on Tuesday (4 December) in an escalating dispute on the country's post-revolutionary future.

"The Muslim Brotherhood is giving Egypt a bad image in Europe. People will think that we are all like them - that we are not democrats and that we are violent, that we want to kill people in the name of Islam. I am also a Muslim but I am not like them," Osama, a 38-year-old Egyptian businessman who took part in the rally, told EUobserver.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

"This is a final warning to [the new Egyptian President Mohamed] Morsi," Sarwat, a 54-year-old biochemist and tourist guide, said.

The protest started at around 5pm local time, with streams of people converging on the presidential palace from various parts of the capital.

One group, from Cairo's middle class Nasr City district, marched past the defence ministry waving Egyptian flags.

The protesters - including Muslim women in veils, women in Western dress carrying children, old men in traditional Egyptian robes and young men in suits - chanted "bahel! [not valid]," referring to Morsi's new draft constitution.

They also yelled "arehl! [Morsi get out]" and "aish horriah! [bread and freedom]," as well as "anzel! [come down]," to encourage people watching them from balconies in overlooking tower blocks to join in.

There was a brief outbreak of violence when activists cut through barbed wire near the palace, prompting police to use batons and to fire tear gas, injuring 18 people, according to Egyptian news.

Another large group chanted slogans and songs late into the night in Tahrir Square in central Cairo.

But the rest of the vast capital city went about its business as usual.

For his part, Morsi left the palace as the crowds grew in number.

His actions stood in contrast to a pro-Morsi rally of a similar size organised by the Muslim Brotherhood - a broad political movement with branches in several Arab countries - also in Cairo last Friday.

It dos not advocate political or religious violence. But some commentators believe it contains extremist elements.

The unrest comes after Morsi one week ago gave himself absolutist new powers, removing presidential oversight by the country's constitutional court.

He said the move is temporary and will be lifted after a referendum on 15 December on a new constitution, which enshrines aspects of the Muslim "sharia" code of behaviour into Egyptian law and gives the president's office more sway in national affairs.

EU countries have promised Egypt billions of euros in aid in a bid to stabilise its economy after the revolution last year and to maintain Western influence in the largest Muslim country in the Middle East.

But Morsi's recent actions have caused concern in Brussels.

"No President of Egypt has placed himself beyond judicial oversight to such extent," a group of 13 cross-party MEPs wrote in an open letter to EU foreign affairs chief Catherine Ashton last week.

"While we favour a close partnership between the EU and Egypt we consider that fundamental principles, such as the separation of powers, an independent judiciary and the rule of law, should be at its base," they added.

For his part, Mohammed, a pro-Morsi school teacher and taxi driver in Cairo, told this website that he trusts Morsi because the president's Islamic faith guarantees that he is not corrupt and because the majority of Egyptians want the country to be run on Islamic lines.

But biochemist and tourist guide Sarwat noted that the new president is doing little to address the concerns of Egypt's liberal and more secular classes.

"He gave a speech at the Muslim Brotherhood protest but he did not speak to us tonight [Tuesday]. This shows that he has taken sides, that he is not the president of all Egyptians," Sarwat said.

"I am an educated man and I have read the new constitution. But I don't know what it really means. You have to be a legal expert and when I see the experts on TV, even they are arguing about the real meaning of this or that paragraph," he added.

"Many of Morsi's supporters cannot read or write. And these are the people who will decide about my country in the referendum," he said.

EU and US thank Egypt for Gaza truce

EU and US statements after one week of Gaza hostilities underline the new status of the Muslim Brotherhood in the region.

Column

These are the crunch issues for the 2019-2024 EU commission

These developments will largely determine who will be running the world in the coming decades and perhaps generations. If the Europeans can't find an answer over the five years, they will be toast. And we haven't even mentioned climate change.

Opinion

Time to pay attention to Belarus

Belarus may be hosting the European Games, but Vladimir Putin is not playing games when it comes to Belarus' independence. The West needs to get serious as well.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersBrussels welcomes Nordic culture
  2. UNESDAUNESDA appoints Nicholas Hodac as Director General
  3. UNESDASoft drinks industry co-signs Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration
  4. FEANIEngineers Europe Advisory Group: Building the engineers of the future
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNew programme studies infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance
  6. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021
  10. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  12. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  2. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  3. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  4. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  8. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  9. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  11. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  12. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us