Monday

22nd Apr 2019

Oxfam accuses EU of hypocrisy

The European Union has rejected the British development charity Oxfam’s accusations that Europe’s sugar regime is undermining opportunities for people in the developing world to work their way out of poverty. Oxfam argues that huge EU sugar subsidies generate vast profits for big sugar processors and large farmers whereas farmers and agricultural labourers in poor countries suffer the consequences.

Oxfam announced that no agricultural sector is in such urgent need of radical reform, however sugar is not even included in the European Commission's latest reform proposals. "European consumers and taxpayers are paying to destroy livelihoods in some of the world's poorest countries," said the charity official.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

The sugar subsidies have helped farmers in Germany, Britain and France to become the world's largest exporters of white sugar, but at the same time they are the world's most expensive producers. It costs 670 euro to produce a tonne of white sugar in Europe while in Brazil and Ethiopia only 280 euro.

Blatant hypocrisy

Oxfam admits that full sugar reform is not going to take place before 2006, therefore they call for some immediate reforms. The charity believes that an immediate 25% cut in EU sugar quota production is needed.

"The sugar regime is a clear example of Europe's blatant hypocrisy in dealing with developing countries," said Phil Bloomer of Oxfam to BBC. EU spokesman, Thorsten Muench, on the other hand said that the EU was taking the lead in opening its sugar markets to the Third World.

EU seeks mini-trade detente with US

EU states have agreed to open trade talks with the US in a bid to rebuild relations with their oldest partner on the world stage.

EU migrants sneaking into US from Mexico

Almost 1,000 Romanian nationals were caught trying to sneak into the United States in 2017, of which around half attempted to cross via Mexico. Nationals from countries like Hungary and the UK were also intercepted.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  2. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  3. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  4. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  9. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  10. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  12. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan

Latest News

  1. Romania drafts EU code on NGO migrant rescues
  2. Bulgaria, Hungary, and Malta shamed on press unfreedom
  3. EU drafts $20bn US sanctions list in aviation dispute
  4. Brunei defends stoning to death of gay men in EU letter
  5. US Democrats side with Ireland on Brexit
  6. Wifi or 5G to connect EU cars? MEPs weigh in
  7. How Brexit may harm the new EU parliament
  8. EU parliament backs whistleblower law

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us