Tuesday

25th Jul 2017

EU cyber directive 'nearly finished'

  • EU rules on cyber-security are expected in January (Photo: UK Ministry of Defence)

The EU executive will release a draft directive on cyber security in 2013, in the latest indication that the bloc is moving towards a harmonised online rulebook.

The bill is likely to propose the creation of a co-operation mechanism to prevent and counter cross-border cyber incidents and a minimum standard of cyber-preparedness at national level.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now and get 40% off for an annual subscription. Sale ends soon.

  1. €90 per year. Use discount code EUOBS40%
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The new legislation is being piloted by EU digital agenda commissioner Neelie Kroes, who announced the plans in a paper on 'Digital priorities for 2013-14' published on Wednesday (18 December).

A commission official indicated that the directive would be released at the end of January, with the draft text currently making its way through several commission departments.

Kroes' spokesperson Ryan Heath told EUobserver that the legislation was "nearly finished." He added that the text was about "recognising that digital freedoms and digital security go hand-in-hand – they have to be balanced and dealt with together."

MEPs are also likely to back EU minimum standards for online security. A non-binding report adopted by parliament in June called on member states to set up national contingency plans in the event of an attack, alongside EU legislation criminalising cyber attacks, including online fraud. Romanian centre-left Ivailo Kalfin, who drafted the report, said that "Europe has to have a single voice on cyber-security."

A new regime of cyber-security would be implemented by the European Cybercrime Centre, which will start work in January. The centre, which will be run out of Europol's headquarters in The Hague, has been tasked with co-ordinating national cyber-crime authorities and training national cyber-security experts. It will also work with the US Department of Justice to combat online child sex abuse.

Kroes also called on the EU to up its game in utilising new technologies such as high speed internet and cloud computing.

Speaking to reporters she warned that the EU "is not positioning itself well enough to benefit from digital developments."

Moreover, at a time when over 20% of European's under-25s are out of work, the EU executive's paper claims that "by 2015, 700,000 to 1 million high-quality ICT jobs will not be filled".

However, she added that "if (it was) not for the digital economy then the EU would be in an even deeper recession"

She went on to say that "if e-commerce were to grow to 15% of the total retail sector and Single Market barriers were eliminated, it is estimated that total consumer welfare gains would be around €204 billion, equivalent to 1.7% of EU GDP."

According to a recent Eurobarometer survey, 40% of users are concerned about their personal data being compromised online, and 38% are worried about the security of online payments.

Meanwhile, a poll in July by the same group revealed that one in ten Europeans had been victims of data theft. Online security firm McAfee estimates that cyber-crime cost businesses $750bn (€600bn) in lost income across the world in 2011.

Opinion

Cyber space needs stronger rule of law

Even cyber warfare should be bound by conventions, for instance, not to attack hospitals, the Dutch foreign minister and the EU foreign policy chief say.

Investigation

Mafia money pollutes the EU economy

Huge amounts of money from criminal activities are funnelled into the legitimate European economy. But little is being done about it at EU or national level.

News in Brief

  1. Wallonia's Magnette leaves national politics
  2. Polish president vetoes justice reforms
  3. Turkey arrests protesters, as journalists go to trial
  4. Poll: Only 24% of Germans want 'strong leader'
  5. US envoy: 'hot war' not frozen conflict in Ukraine
  6. BMW denies Dieselgate cartel allegations
  7. Polish parliament adopts controversial justice reform
  8. GMO opt-out plan unlikely to go anywhere in 2017

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Jewish CongressJean-Marie Le Pen Faces Trial for Oven Comments About Jewish Singer
  2. ACCAAnnounces Belt & Road Research at Shanghai Conference
  3. ECPAFood waste in the field can double without crop protection. #WithOrWithout #pesticides
  4. EU2017EEEstonia Allocates €1 Million to Alleviate Migratory Pressure From Libya in Italy
  5. Dialogue PlatformFethullah Gulen's Message on the Anniversary of the Coup Attempt in Turkey
  6. Martens CentreWeeding out Fake News: An Approach to Social Media Regulation
  7. European Jewish CongressEJC Concerned by Normalisation of Antisemitic Tropes in Hungary
  8. Counter BalanceOut for Summer Episode 1: How the EIB Sweeps a Development Fiasco Under the Rug
  9. CESICESI to Participate in Sectoral Social Dialogue Committee on Postal Services
  10. ILGA-EuropeMalta Keeps on Rocking: Marriage Equality on Its Way
  11. European Friends of ArmeniaEuFoA Director and MEPs Comment on the Recent Conflict Escalation in Nagorno-Karabakh
  12. EU2017EEEstonian Presidency Kicks off Youth Programme With Coding Summer School