Sunday

28th Nov 2021

Rainbow flag protesters charged by Polish police

  • One of the statues targeted by pro-LGBTI flag-hangers in Warsaw (Photo: Fred Romero)

LGBTI activists are facing fines or prison for draping rainbow flags on statues in Poland, amid hardening feelings on EU values.

Police, on Wednesday (5 August), briefly arrested two women and a man for hanging flags on five Polish monuments, including a Roman Catholic one, in Warsaw last week.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

  • Pride march in Warsaw last year (Photo: Max Bashyrov)

They also pressed charges under a law against offending religious feeling, punishable by fines or up to two years in jail.

"As the police, we take action not because somebody hung a flag, but because by so doing they insulted religious feelings and profaned, among others, the statue of Jesus Christ outside the Basilica of the Holy Cross," police spokesman Sylwester Marczak told media, referring to a church in Warsaw city centre.

"Reducing the whole thing to a flag makes it political, because it doesn't include those people who were hurt," Marczak said.

Police did not exclude other arrests in the case, he noted.

Police were also investigating a separate case, in which a man on a balcony, next to a rainbow flag, grabbed his crotch during a World War II memorial march last weekend, Marczak said earlier.

The police crackdown prompted accusations of undemocratic behaviour.

It also came amid raw nerves over an EU decision, last week, to impose symbolic fines against Polish cities which had made homophobic declarations.

The police had behaved like communist-era apparatchiks, according to Sławomir Neumann, an MP from the opposition Civic Platform (PO) party.

"Do you really have to suck up to the authorities so hard?", Neumann said on Wednesday, according to Polish state TV.

"The rainbow flag shouldn't offend anybody," Rafał Trzaskowski, the PO's mayor of Warsaw, also said on Tuesday.

"No democratic country should allow the kind of incidents we saw, in which police enters people's private homes," he added, referring to police efforts to stop the balcony protester last weekend.

Meanwhile, the ruling Law and Justice (PiS) party voiced its own offence.

"If we don't react, all boundaries will be broken. Vulgarities will become the norm at [public] gatherings," Arkadiusz Czartoryski, a PiS MP, said on Wednesday.

"Rafał Trzaskowski once again stands on the side of homosexual communities, showing them absurd support," Maria Koc, a PiS senator, said one day earlier.

For some, the balcony-crotch grabber might be "normal, modern, European, and free", Rafał Bochenek, another PiS MP told press.

But for him that kind of behaviour was "pathological", he said.

"Let's stop with this leftie media gobbledigook. It's a harmful ideology. Stop interfering in our lives," Bochenek said, referring to LGBTI values and EU 'interference'.

The LGBTI arrests came amid already heated debate on the EU fines against Polish cities and against a wider backdrop of PiS-sponsored euroscepticism and homophobia.

One PiS MP, Przemysław Czarnek, said on Monday that "LGBTI ideology grew out of ... the same root as Germany's Hitlerian National Socialism" after news of the EU penalties.

Czarnek, last year, also offered medals to MPs who voted for an anti-LGBTI resolution, but a court in the Polish city of Lublin ruled, on Wednesday, that that did not add up to corruption.

He is outspoken even by PiS standards.

Ziobro's project

But the man who will decide how hard to hit the Polish rainbow-flag protesters - Polish justice minister and prosecutor general Zbigniew Ziobro - is also a hawk.

The LGBTI activists were guilty of "hooligan excesses" and the EU should stop funding gay-rights groups, Ziobro said on Monday.

Ziobro's ministry has also funded a media project by a right-wing Polish foundation, the Guardian of Remembrance, on countering pro-LGBTI activism in future.

The project, reported by Polish newspapers on Wednesday, was called: "Counteracting crimes related to the violation of the freedom of conscience committed under the influence of LGBTI ideology".

And it aimed at "eliminating from the Polish public sphere", by 2023, anything that "violated the rights of religious people", in an approach which augured badly for EU-protected minorities in the bloc's fifth-largest member state.

Six 'LGBTI-free' Polish cities left out of EU funding

Six Polish cities that declared themselves as "LGBTI-free zones" have been denied funding under the EU's Town Twinning programme for failing to meet the standards of "equal access and non-discrimination".

Polish 'LGBTI-free zones' not OK, says EU commission

The European Commissioner for equality Helena Dalli has said the distribution of 'LGBTI-free zones' stickers or the adoption of anti-LGBTI resolutions cannot be allowed. Some 86 towns in Poland have so far declared themselves 'LGBTI-free zones'.

Summer of discontent in eastern Europe

From Bulgaria, to Serbia, Hungary, and up north to Poland and Belarus, the loosely defined area of eastern Europe is far from having a peaceful summer.

Letter

Time for EU pressure on Warsaw homophobes

It is time to show Poland's homophobic ruling party that it isn't possible to erode human rights and our common European values without a price.

News in Brief

  1. Covid variant: EU to block travel from southern Africa
  2. France and UK seek EU help on Channel migrants
  3. New Swedish PM who resigned after 7 hours gets second chance
  4. Belgium to decide on Friday on Covid measures
  5. UK rings alarm on new Covid strain in South Africa
  6. Turkish police use tear gas at women's rights march
  7. Poland calls for more Nato troops
  8. Ex-Navalny aide leaves Russia

Feature

Covid-hit homeless find Xmas relief at Brussels food centre

The Kamiano food distribution centre in Brussels is expecting 20 people every half hour on Christmas Day. For many, Kamiano is also more than that - a support system for those made homeless or impoverished.

Top court finds Hungary and Poland broke EU rules

EU tribunal said Hungary's legislation made it "virtually impossible" to make an asylum application. Restricting access to international protection procedure is a violation of EU rules.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNew report reveals bad environmental habits
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersImproving the integration of young refugees
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNATO Secretary General guest at the Session of the Nordic Council
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCan you love whoever you want in care homes?
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals

Latest News

  1. Belgium goes into three-week 'lockdown light'
  2. MEPs list crimes of 'Kremlin proxy' mercenaries
  3. EU to open up 'black box' of political ads
  4. Can the ECB solve climate change and inflation on its own?
  5. EU set to limit vaccine certificate to nine months
  6. Surprise coalition in Romania without former Renew's Ciolos
  7. This 'Black Friday' is a turning point in corporate accountability
  8. West struggling to show strength on Ukraine

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us