Tuesday

21st Feb 2017

Report: EU border crackdown puts migrants in danger

  • EU governments have spent some €238 million in erecting fences (Photo: Vadim Ghirda)

Billions spent by the EU and member states to curb migration flows into Europe are forcing people to take increasingly dangerous and covert routes, according to a report.

Some 330,000 people seeking international protection are expected to arrive by the Mediterranean sea this year through "overt" routes. But around 900,000 are set to file for asylum.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The gap between the two figures suggests a massive shift towards covert routes and means, the UK-based Overseas Development Institute (ODI) said in a report out Thursday (15 September).

"While on the surface, the number of people arriving in Europe has fallen, the rate of those taking hidden routes to Europe has not been affected and is likely to increase," said Marta Foresti, author of the report, in a statement.

Last year, some 35 percent of all arrivals came to the EU using covert means like false documents. In 2016, the number is set to increase to 60 percent.

Ouvert routes include travelling through Morocco to Spain or crossing the Mediterranean to reach Italy, among others.

False documents, bribing border guard, hiding in vehicles, overstaying visas, fall under the covert route category.

Europol and migrant smuggling

The EU police agency Europol earlier this week issued similar findings.

It noted migrant smugglers have adapted to stricter border controls and "use new routes and modi operandi to evade law enforcement."

The agency had also found a 295 percent increase, when compared to last year, in the number of Turkish nationals that now ply the migrant smuggling trade.

More than 12,000 new migrant smuggling suspects were reported and identified by Europol in the first eight months of this year alone.

The EU, for its part, signed off a migrant swap deal with Turkey in March that has resulted in a sharp drop of people crossing the Aegean to the Greek islands.

Hidden costs

But the ODI report suggests the bilateral agreement with Turkey, among other efforts like trust funds in Syria and Africa, has had little overall affect on stopping people from seeking other ways to enter Europe.

"There is a significant chance that in the long term, border controls instituted by Europe could end up increasing flows," noted the report.

The researchers had also found little evidence to suggest that efforts to address the root causes slowed migration flows.

They suggested that the some €15.3 billion spent by the EU and member states since December 2014 do not demonstrate the intended results.

They also estimated that another €27.3 billion will need to be spent on the "reception, procedural and resettlement costs" of people who arrived in 2015 and those expected to arrive until the end of this year.

Those costs and hidden flows that help drive migrant smuggling can be curtailed by opening up more legal channels, say the researchers.

News in Brief

  1. EU ministers approve anti-tax avoidance directive
  2. Poland rejects EU criticism of court changes
  3. German nationalist leader met with Putin allies in Moscow
  4. German housing market overheated, says Bundesbank
  5. France invites three EU leaders for Versailles summit in March
  6. Greece agrees on new bailout reforms
  7. EU commission denies Juncker resignation rumour
  8. US "strongly committed" to cooperation with EU, says vice-president

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNICEFNearly 1.4 Million Children at Risk of Death as Famine Looms Across Africa and Yemen
  2. Malta EU 2017End of Roaming Fees: Council Reaches Agreement on Wholesale Caps
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Help Startups Access US Market
  4. Centre Maurits CoppietersMinorities and Migrations
  5. Salzburg Global SeminarThe Child in the City: Health, Parks and Play
  6. UNICEFNumber of Ukrainian Children Needing Aid Nearly Doubles to 1 Million Over the Past Year
  7. Centre Maurits CoppietersThe Situation of Refugee Women in Europe
  8. Salzburg Global SeminarToward a Shared Culture of Health: Charting the Patient-Clinician Relationship
  9. European Free AllianceAustria Should Preserve & Promote Bilingual and Multinational Carinthia
  10. Martens CentreShow Your Love for Democracy! Take Part in Our Contest: "If It's Broken, Let's Fix It"
  11. CISPECloud Computing Leaders Establish Data Protection Standards to Protect Customer Data
  12. Malta EU 2017Landmark Deal Reached With European Parliament on Portability of Online Content

Latest News

  1. Dieselgate: EU disappointed with VW's treatment of customers
  2. French police raid Le Pen's party office
  3. The Armenia-Azerbaijan war: A refugee's story
  4. Greece and creditors break bailout deadlock
  5. Internal EU report exposes Libya turmoil
  6. EU commissioner condemns 'delay' in post-Dieselgate reform
  7. Sweden fights back as foreign leaders make up bad news
  8. Nordstream 2: Alternative pipeline facts