Thursday

30th Jun 2022

Russians top EU asylum seekers

  • The highest number came from EU neighbour Russia (Photo: Boris SV)

The EU saw the highest number of asylum seekers come from Russia at the beginning of this year, with Syrians following closely behind.

Recently-released Eurostat figures for the first three months of 2013 saw 8,435 Russians, half of them aged under 18, seek asylum in the EU while 8,395 people from Syria - in the throes of civil war - also came to EU doors.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

Next on the list in terms of numbers were Afghans (5,880), Pakistanis (4,310) and Somalians (3,430).

In comparison to the same period last year, the biggest increase in numbers was represented by Syrians - 6,000 more than between January and March 2012 - and Russians, with 4000 more.

The biggest relative increase between the two years were for Malians seeking asylum. This year saw a 400 percent increase in refugees from the Africa country, which has been threatened by Jihadist fighters and saw French military intervention in Spring.

Sweden saw the highest number of asylum applications - 9,720 - in relation to its population size while Germany, the EU's most populous member state, accounted for almost a quarter of all asylum applications in the EU at the beginning of this year.

Germany also saw the biggest increase - 6000 - in asylum seekers compared to last year and has over 80,000 pending applications.

Greece, often in the news for its over-run and badly kept asylum centres, follows with just under 40,000 pending applications and then Belgium with around 28,000.

France had the highest rejection rate at 84 percent, followed by Germany (65%) and Sweden (52%).

Asylum seekers from Serbia were the most likely to be rejected (97%) while 25 percent of Syrians were given the green light.

Overall the number of asylum seekers was up at the beginning of this year. Between January and March there were 85,000 applications, 15,000 more than in the first quarter in 2012.

Private firms put price tag on migrant suicides

Private security companies operating UK-based immigrant removal centres use formulas to calculate the profit loss incurred when detainees commit suicide under their watch.

Opinion

Romania — latest EU hotspot in backlash against LGBT rights

Romania isn't the only country portraying lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) people as a threat to children. From Poland and Hungary in EU, to reactionary movements around the world are prohibiting portrayals of LGBT people and families in schools.

News in Brief

  1. EU announces trade deal with New Zealand
  2. Russia threatens Norway over goods transit
  3. Russia urges Nato not to build bases in Sweden, Finland
  4. New president for European Committee of the Regions
  5. Gas flows from Spain to Morocco, after Western Sahara row
  6. BioNTech, Pfizer test 'universal' coronavirus vaccine
  7. UK sanctions second-richest Russian businessman
  8. Hungary permits emergency supervision of energy firms

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  3. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  5. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022
  6. EFBWW – EFBH – FETBBHow price increases affect construction workers

Latest News

  1. Israel smeared Palestinian activists, EU admits
  2. MEPs boycott awards over controversial sponsorship
  3. If Russia collapses — which states will break away?
  4. EU Parliament interpreters stage strike
  5. EU's post-Covid billions flowing into black hole
  6. Nato expands and reinforces on Russian flank
  7. EU Commission says it cannot find messages with Pfizer CEO
  8. EU ministers sign off on climate laws amid German infighting

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us