Thursday

19th Oct 2017

Feature

Meet the Swedish love mob fighting online hate

  • Racism and hate speech is thriving online, and the discussion is ongoing on how they can be tackled. (Photo: IAPP)

The bodies weren't cold yet, fumes from the burning truck were still lingering over Stockholm city centre, when another war broke out - this time, online.

The Swedish far-right Internet swiftly responded to the terror attack of Friday (7 April) by laying the blame with the country's largest parties - the ruling Social Democrats and the centre-right Moderates that preceded them - and their migration policies that had brought Muslims into the country.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

  • Stockholm terror attack on 7 April triggered a wave of hate messages on internet. (Photo: TT News Agency/Anders Wiklund/via Reuters)

Some of the accusations, which quickly spread through social media, were illustrated with pictures of the victims. One showed the ravaged body of an 11 year old girl; her family's calls for the photographs to be taken down were in vain.

Others suggested that the attack, for which an Uzbek with Islamist sympathies has been arrested, was a "false flag" operation orchestrated by Swedish authorities. A widely circulated conspiracy relied on details that were later tracked down to sloppy reporting by the Daily Mail, a British tabloid.

Other lies were spread by politicians from the far-right Sweden Democrats (SD), the third largest party in Sweden, whose party secretary Richard Jomshof tweeted an edited image that claimed a priest had asked people to "forgive the terrorist". Jomshof eventually deleted the message but said that it didn't matter if it was fake, "the basic matter is the same".

But if the hateful remarks, lies and conspiracies were meant to divide people and pick political points on the terror, they may have backfired.

When Stockholm responded to the attack with the largest rally ever held in the Swedish capital, and thousands of people formed a human chain around the terror site, right-wingers started to lambaste them too.

"Something is really wrong with the Swedish people. They should be furious, instead they are thirsty for love," one far-right journalist complained.

Swedes also fought back against online hate by spreading messages of solidarity and support in the comment fields of media and Facebook.

"Hate spreads hate, so spread love," one woman wrote in reply to some remarks on the Facebook page of a Swedish newspaper, adding a heart.

"You're doing exactly what the terrorists want - you sow hate and fear," another added.

Others ended their posts with the hashtag #jagärhär, or #iamhere.

A love mob against racism

#Jagärhär is a closed group on Facebook.

It was created last May by Mina Dennert, a Swedish journalist with roots in the Middle East, who has said the amount of hate she faced on daily basis had made her "feel a bit smaller every year".

"We are not an opinion mob. Our success is not necessarily measured as getting others to change their views. Rather, the purpose of the group is to allow more people to make themselves heard and to facilitate good discussions without hate and threats," the group rules say.

#jagärhär doesn't tell people what to write; it's up to everyone to formulate a message.

Each day, group members link to a newspaper's comment section or social media page where egregious comments and personal attacks have started to take hold. Before long, hundreds of group members will have left friendly messages and appeals for a reasoned discussion in the face of hatred.

The method may sound prim, but it works.

After the terror attack, which marked the start of a particularly busy time for anti-hate vigilantes, the group managed to get many racist comments deleted, including some that were illustrated by pictures of the 11 year-old victim.

The love mob also backed up politicians and other people who suffered the wrath of racists.

"Am I allowed to write here? I just wanted to thank all the kind people who went to my Facebook page," wrote Magnus Betner, a comedian known for poking fun at racism, whose social media profile was covered in venom in the wake of the attack.

"I knew exactly what would happen and didn't feel like spending the weekend replying to criticism from people who refuse to listen, so I just didn't enter my page. Thanks to all of you who did it instead," he added.

The group itself wrote that it wasn't looking to defend the perpetrator of the deeds, nor to take political sides.

"We want to prevent that this tragedy is used to push through harder and colder policies, at odds with the warmth and compassion that Stockholmians and Swedes have shown during the last days," a moderator wrote in the group.

The rise of hate mobs

The internet has long been a place where hate against Muslims, women and sexual minorities has thrived, a problem that isn't unique for Sweden.

Fears that fake news and hate speech could propel support for xenophobic parties in the upcoming elections recently had the German government propose that sites which fail to delete slanderous content could be fined by up to €50 million. Berlin has also urged the EU to legislate against fake news.

But such calls have prompted concerns that any ban on fake news would just curb free speech. An idea doesn't die just because it has been deleted from Facebook.

While the discussion on how to legislate fake news could turn out barren, different private initiatives try to solve some of the problems.

Sleeping Giants is an organisation that calls on business to stop advertising with hate sites, in a bid to freeze their ad revenues.

In Germany, the Recht gegen Rechts (Right Against Right) foundation has launched a crowdfunding campaign - Donate the Hate - where people donate one euro to refugee and anti-far right programmes for each hateful comment posted online.

Such projects are still testing waters, but in Sweden, #jagärhär has already been described as a unique initiative that empowers people to make their voice heard.

The group is already widely known in Sweden because of its efforts and has quickly gathered more than 70,000 members who actively take part in the different calls. It has also launched English and German versions, #iamhere and #ichbinhier.

Dennert, the founder of #jagärhär, told EUobserver the group is in touch with Facebook and is pushing the social network to do more to remove what's illegal.

"In my lay view, the problem is not with the law but that it's not followed. Only a small part of all hate speech in Sweden is removed or registered with the police and investigated," she said.

The group should above all enable civic courage and discussion, she said.

"People feel good when they speak up when something is wrong. We feel good when we are there for each other," she said.

"Every time we act, a little bit of fear disappears. We are changing the world, one comment at a time. And we change ourselves."

Investigation

Sex and lies: Russia's EU news

France and Germany have been targeted for years with fake news and lies designed to incite sexual revulsion toward migrants and the politicians who gave them shelter.

Analysis

Obesity linked to agricultural policy, new studies say

The number of obese children and adolescents worldwide has risen tenfold in the past four decades, according to the WHO. Health campaigners are pushing for a radical rethink of the EU's common agricultural policy to help tackle the obesity epidemic.

News in Brief

  1. MEPs and states agree on CO2 exemption for flights
  2. Spanish government to decide Saturday on Catalonia measures
  3. EU court confirms freezing of Yanukovych funds
  4. UK PM appeals to EU citizens
  5. Catalan leader sends independence ultimatum
  6. Madrid eyes early elections as solution to Catalan crisis
  7. Merkel starts coalition talks to form government by December
  8. Iceland confirms long-standing EU opposition, poll shows

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EU2017EENorth Korea Leaves Europe No Choice, Says Estonian Foreign Minister Sven Mikser
  2. Mission of China to the EUZhang Ming Appointed New Ambassador of the Mission of China to the EU
  3. International Partnership for Human RightsEU Should Seek Concrete Commitments From Azerbaijan at Human Rights Dialogue
  4. European Jewish CongressEJC Calls for New Austrian Government to Exclude Extremist Freedom Party
  5. CES - Silicones EuropeIn Healthcare, Silicones Are the Frontrunner. And That's a Good Thing!
  6. EU2017EEEuropean Space Week 2017 in Tallinn from November 3-9. Register Now!
  7. European Entrepreneurs CEA-PMEMobiliseSME Exchange Programme Open Doors for 400 Companies Across Europe
  8. CECEE-Privacy Regulation – Hands off M2M Communication!
  9. ILGA-EuropeHealth4LGBTI: Reducing Health Inequalities Experienced by LGBTI People
  10. EU2017EEEHealth: A Tool for More Equal Health
  11. Mission of China to the EUChina-EU Tourism a Key Driver for Job Creation and Enhanced Competitiveness
  12. CECENon-Harmonised Homologation of Mobile Machinery Costs € 90 Million per Year

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. ILGA-EuropeMass Detention of Azeri LGBTI People - the LGBTI Community Urgently Needs Your Support
  2. European Free AllianceCatalans Have Won the Right to Have an Independent State
  3. ECR GroupBrexit: Delaying the Start of Negotiations Is Not a Solution
  4. EU2017EEPM Ratas in Poland: "We Enjoy the Fruits of European Cooperation Thanks to Solidarity"
  5. Mission of China to the EUChina and UK Discuss Deepening of Global Comprehensive Strategic Partnership
  6. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceEHLA Joins Commissioners Navracsics, Andriukaitis and Hogan at EU Week of Sport
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council Representative Office Opens in Brussels to Foster Better Cooperation
  8. UNICEFSocial Protection in the Contexts of Fragility & Forced Displacement
  9. CESIJoin CESI@Noon on October 18 and Debate On: 'European Defence Union: What Next?'
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Support Start-Ups
  11. ILGA EuropeInternational Attention Must Focus on LGBTI People in Azerbaijan After Police Raids
  12. European Jewish CongressStrong Results of Far Right AfD Party a Great Concern for Germans and European Jews