Monday

4th Jul 2022

Agenda

Brexit summit, Turkey and Hungary dominate EU This WEEK

  • Juncker to meet with May on Wednesday ahead of the Brexit summit later that week

European leaders are digesting the result of the first round of French elections with cautious optimism, as centrist and pro-European Emmanuel Macron takes the lead ahead of far-right leader Marine Le Pen with the second round taking place in two weeks time.

Macron promised to be a "path of hope" for a stronger and reformed Europe.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

Attention will quickly turn back from France to Britain in Brussels as leaders gather on Saturday (29 April) afternoon to agree on the Brexit negotiating guidelines, which represent the priorities and the red lines of the EU-27 countries.

The guidelines foresee a phased negotiation after first achieving "sufficient progress" on the divorce settlement, which would focus on citizens' rights, the financial settlement and the border with the Republic of Ireland, before talks on the future relationship can begin.

Before the summit, European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker and the EU's chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, will travel to London to meet with UK prime minister Theresa May on Wednesday (26 April).

Turkey

Turkey will also be in the spotlight this week as EU foreign ministers discuss the future of the accession talks and the relationship with Turkey on Friday (28 April) in Malta.

Turkey's president, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is to be granted more extensive powers following his narrow majority in a referendum on 16 April, which observers say did not meet international standards.

The EU's foreign policy chief, Federica Mogherini, will also discuss Turkey in a debate with MEPs on Wednesday (26 April).

Hungary

The Hungarian government's latest measures to stifle the Budapest-based Central European University (CEU), founded by billionaire George Soros, and its planned legislation to target civil groups supported by Soros' foundation have yet again caused alarm in Brussels about the country's increasingly illiberal democracy.

The European Parliament will debate the situation in Hungary on Wednesday (26 April). CEU's rector, Michael Ignatieff, will also be at the EP on Tuesday (25 April).

George Soros will travel to Brussels to discuss the situation in Hungary with several EU commissioners, he will then meet with Jean-Claude Juncker on Thursday (27 April).

On the same day, the EU commission is expected to launch several infringement procedures against Hungary.

Leaders of the European People's Party (EPP), before the Brexit summit on Saturday, will be weighing in on whether Hungarian prime minister Viktor Orban's ruling Fidesz party (an EPP member) should remain part of the centre-right political family.

TTIP

Cecilia Malmstroem, the EU’s trade commissioner, is in Washington on Monday (24 April) for the first meeting with US officials on how to proceed with talks over the planned US-EU trade deal that was thrown into doubt since Donald Trump has become president who favours protectionist policies.

The deal is known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, or TTIP.

Talks for it were launched in 2013, but have been hampered by opposition from various NGOs, consumer and environmentalist groups.

Anti-Soros university bill sparks protest in Budapest

Thousands gathered around the Central European University on Tuesday to protest against a legislative bill that targets it, while the US embassy and the German president expressed their support for the institution.

MEPs endorse EP red lines on Brexit

Juncker said the EU is looking for success with the UK during talks, as the European Parliament outlines its position on citizens, borders, and the bill that will have to be settled before London can move on to future discussions.

Czech presidency and key nuclear/gas vote This WEEK

MEPs will gather in Strasbourg for the final plenary before the summer break, with a crucial vote on the classification of gas and nuclear. The Czech Republic will present to EU lawmakers its presidency's priorities for the next six months.

G7, Nato, gas anxiety and Ukraine top This WEEK

EU energy ministers and environment ministers are expected to reach common positions on different aspects of the Fit for 55 package — as the continent is increasingly worried about energy prices and future supplies.

Opinion

The human rights aspects of Grenoble's 'burkini' controversy

Sooner or later, the European Court of Human Rights will have a final say on whether Grenoble is allowed to permit the 'burkini'. Its judgment, like the one permitting the outlawing of full-face veils, risks influencing policymaking across the continent.

Opinion

Council must act on core of EU migration package

By only screening, fingerprinting or relocating (some) refugees, or by outsourcing our border control to Turkey and giving Erdogan our keys, we will not solve the current problems.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic and Canadian ministers join forces to combat harmful content online
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers write to EU about new food labelling
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersEmerging journalists from the Nordics and Canada report the facts of the climate crisis
  4. Council of the EUEU: new rules on corporate sustainability reporting
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers for culture: Protect Ukraine’s cultural heritage!
  6. Reuters InstituteDigital News Report 2022

Latest News

  1. Ex-Frontex chief 'uninvited' from parliament committee
  2. Czech presidency and key nuclear/gas vote This WEEK
  3. The human rights aspects of Grenoble's 'burkini' controversy
  4. Council must act on core of EU migration package
  5. Nato's Madrid summit — key takeaways
  6. Czech presidency to fortify EU embrace of Ukraine
  7. Covid-profiting super rich should fight hunger, says UN food chief
  8. EU pollution and cancer — it doesn't have to be this way

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us