Sunday

26th May 2019

Denmark says No to more EU, casts shadow on UK vote

  • Campaign poster: 'More EU? No Thanks' (Photo: EUobserver)

Danish voters, on Thursday (3 December), responded with a clear No when asked to integrate deeper with the European Union.

The referendum resulted in a large majority - 53.1 percent No, against 46.9 percent Yes - refusing to join EU justice and home affairs policies. Denmark opted out from this part of EU policy when ratifying the Maastricht treaty 22 years ago.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

  • Dahl promised that a separate referendum could be held on Europol (Photo: EUobserver)

"People wanted to stay in control, and I have great respect for this,” said Liberal prime minister Lars Loekke Rasmussen.

Loekke Rasmussen phoned EU commission president Jean-Claude Juncker and Council president Donald Tusk on Thursday evening and plans to start talks in Brussels on 11 December to secure a parallel deal regarding future Danish participation in Europol, the EU’s joint police body.

Loekke Rasmussen also invited all political parties in the Danish parliament for one-to-one talks on Monday, in order to digest the referendum result and formulate a new Europe policy.

"I have already indicated my support for [UK prime minister] Cameron and his talks ahead of a British referendum to secure continued membership of the EU. We have a strong ally in Great Britain to reform the EU," the Danish PM said.

Brexit link

The Danish referendum campaign saw little attention from abroad, but the result could impact the Brexit referendum campaign.

"The result opens a completely new agenda in Europe, an agenda of less EU. For the first time, we can have a debate about the possibility of returning sovereignty to member states from the EU," Soeren Espersen, the eurosceptic Danish People's Party's foreign affairs spokesperson, told EUobserver.

"I will recommend Loekke [Danish PM] to contact British PM David Cameron already tomorrow morning and initiate co-operation between a larger group of EU countries that share this agenda of less EU," said Danish MEP Morten Messerschmidt, from the Danish People's Party, which sits with the Tories in the European Parliament.

“I’m sure some will try and use the Danish opt-out vote, but the vote was about deeper integration into the EU on a very specific area, while the UK referendum is about leaving the EU entirely. That is a very different thing," Richard Corbett, a British MEP from the opposition Labour party noted.

"Had the Danish referendum been about leaving the EU, the result would have been very difficult.”

New Europol referendum

The No-campaign was backed by four parties: the People's Movement against the EU, which advocates an EU exit; the red-green alliance; the new, business-oriented Liberal Alliance; and the Danish People's Party.

But the main winner of Thursday's vote is the Danish People’s Party, the second biggest party in parliament and a key ally of the government.

Party leader Kristian Thulesen Dahl wants Denmark to be a full member of Europol, also when it becomes a supranational organisation from 2017 onward.

He promised during the campaign that a separate referendum could be held on Europol if needed and that his party would advocate a Yes.

A large majority in parliament, including the Liberal governing party, as well as the Social Democrat opposition, also say Yes.

Their campaigns, ahead of Thursday, urged Danes to help police battle cyber-crime, paedophilia, and human trafficking by voting Yes and told Danes they would be forced to leave the EU's police co-operation Europol if they voted No.

Many Danes want their country to be a full member of Europol, but the government chose to bundle the issue with the general justice opt-out, and lost.

In general the No-votes came from rural areas, while urbanites voted Yes.

There was also a generational divide, with many young people voting No, while many of the over 60-years of age voted Yes.

The turn-out was high, on 72 percent.

EU offers Denmark backdoor to Europol

Denmark's government and political parties are examining a draft agreement that would secure links with Europol starting May 2017, in a follow-up to a referendum last year that rejected full membership into the EU law enforcement agency.

News in Brief

  1. Flemish far-right in Belgian election boost
  2. Exit poll: Greek conservatives beat Syriza
  3. Kurz on top in Austria, despite Strache scandal
  4. Greens come in second in Germany, exit polls say
  5. Voter turnout rises in Europe at EU elections
  6. Former EU climate chief cheered by 40,000 activists in Denmark
  7. UK's May announces June 7 resignation date
  8. Ireland votes for EU election and divorce referendum

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Vote for the EU Sutainable Energy AwardsCast your vote for your favourite EUSEW Award finalist. You choose the winner of 2019 Citizen’s Award.
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersEducation gets refugees into work
  3. Counter BalanceSign the petition to help reform the EU’s Bank
  4. UNICEFChild rights organisations encourage candidates for EU elections to become Child Rights Champions
  5. UNESDAUNESDA Outlines 2019-2024 Aspirations: Sustainability, Responsibility, Competitiveness
  6. Counter BalanceRecord citizens’ input to EU bank’s consultation calls on EIB to abandon fossil fuels
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsAnnual EU-Turkmenistan Human Rights Dialogue takes place in Ashgabat
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNew campaign: spot, capture and share Traces of North
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersLeading Nordic candidates go head-to-head in EU election debate
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  11. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  12. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year

Latest News

  1. Thunberg: We can still fix climate, but must start today
  2. Turnout up in Slovakia, with pro-EU liberals scoring high
  3. Belgium votes in hybrid EU-national election
  4. Irish greens take Dublin in second EU exit poll
  5. EU election results to trigger top jobs scramble This WEEK
  6. Don't tell the Dutch - but Timmermans 'won'
  7. EU says goodbye to May with 'respect'
  8. Strache scandal: how big a hit will Austrian far-right take?

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  2. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  3. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic food policy inspires India to be a sustainable superpower
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  8. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership
  9. Intercultural Dialogue PlatformRoundtable: Muslim Heresy and the Politics of Human Rights, Dr. Matthew J. Nelson
  10. Platform for Peace and JusticeTurkey suffering from the lack of the rule of law
  11. UNESDASoft Drinks Europe welcomes Tim Brett as its new president
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic ministers take the lead in combatting climate change

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us