Tuesday

11th May 2021

Hungary must keep Russian vaccine within borders, says EU

Hungary can purchase and distribute the Russian-made vaccine against Covid-19 - but only if it invokes emergency procedures and keeps it within its own borders, the EU warned on Monday (30 November).

"The vaccine cannot be circulated elsewhere in the European Union other than Hungary," chief European Commission spokesperson, Eric Mamer, told reporters.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

The government in Budapest may end up rolling out the Russian-made vaccine Sputnik V, named after the Soviet-era space programme, without first getting market authorisation from the Amsterdam-based European Medicines Agency (EMA).

The agency is tasked to ensure vaccines are safe and effective before they are distributed for wider use in the European Union.

Any vaccine based on biotechnologies must also first secure approval from the agency prior to roll out.

However, a member state may skip the agency altogether - but only if it invokes specific national emergency procedures.

Such emergency procedures also have to be limited in duration.

"It is a decision which will be taken by the Hungarian authorities and they are the ones who will assume full responsibility for follow up," said Stefan de Keersmaecker, the commission's spokesperson on health.

He noted that no data or information on the Russian vaccine has so far been shared.

Nor has the EMA received a request for Sputnik V market-authorisation.

But it is holding discussions with its developer, a state-run institute.

Russia became the first country to approve an anti Covid-19 vaccine, in early August. But critics say the approval was rushed, given it had not completed standard testing phases.

The vaccine initially claimed to be 92 percent effective. The figure increased to 95 percent following announcement results of similar vaccines by Pfizer-Biotech and Moderna.

Sputnik V was licensed based on trials involving 76 people, which then increased to 18,000, leading to the 95 percent figure.

Hungary is the first EU state to secure the Russian vaccine, amid plans to launch clinical trials this month.

Larger shipments to Hungary would then be sent in the second half of January, if the virus is deemed effective. Budapest is also mulling purchases from Israel and China.

Investigation

EU taxpayers in the dark on US corona-drug deal

The EU recently signed a huge contract for a US anti-corona drug which, the WHO says, might not work, but there's little transparency on how the deal was made.

EU seeks new deal for '90% effective' Covid-19 vaccine

After an experimental Covid-19 vaccine developed by the American giant Pfizer and its German partner BioNTech was found to be more than 90 percent effective, the EU announced that it will sign a contract for up to 300 million doses.

EU defends its slower vaccine authorisation

After the UK approved the use of the Covid-19 vaccine developed by Pfizer/BioNtech, the pressure is mounting on the EU. But how are these vaccines approved in the bloc - and what is the legal liability?

News in Brief

  1. Lukashenko amends emergency transfer of power
  2. German centre-left picks Scholz as would-be chancellor
  3. EU has not ordered AstraZeneca vaccines beyond June
  4. Macron: Pandemic showed need for more EU integration
  5. Election win fuels Scottish nationalists' referendum plan
  6. Surge in migrant arrivals to Italian island
  7. EU embassy pays bail for Georgia opposition leader
  8. British aristocrats caught peddling Kremlin ties

Conservatives' Covid-strategy wins in lockdown-fatigue Madrid

Madrid conservative leader Isabel Diaz Ayuso has become a political phenomenon mainly because of her success in keeping Madrid open during the worst moments of the pandemic. However, critics accuse her of neglecting health services - while only protecting businesses.

Column

The EU needs a global vaccination strategy - right now

The further the vaccination campaign progresses, the more people will ask: what about the rest of the world? The EU should answer the question loud and clear now before it is drowned out by a rising chorus of criticism.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region can and should play a leading role in Europe’s digital development
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council to host EU webinars on energy, digitalisation and antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. EU and US urge Israel to defuse Jerusalem violence
  2. Frontex 'mislabelling minors as adults' on Greek islands
  3. Has Albania really met the 15 tests to join the EU? No
  4. Vaccine fairness plus Russia on table This WEEK
  5. EU ambassadors flock to Red Square for Putin's parade
  6. MEPs win battle for bigger citizens' voice at Conference
  7. Hungary gags EU ministers on China
  8. Poland and Hungary push back on 'gender equality' pre-summit

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us