Sunday

26th Sep 2021

Banks to pay 'fair share' under EU transactions tax

  • Banks must be made to pay "their fair share" the commission says (Photo: Trois Têtes)

The European Commission on Wednesday (28 September) unveiled plans to slap a tax on financial transactions in the EU, a scheme that the EU executive hope will raise some €57 billion a year in revenues.

Jose Manuel Barroso, the president of the commission announced that the college of commissioners had adopted the proposal, long expected and dreaded by the City of London, during his state of the union address to the European Parliament in Strasbourg.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

All financial transactions in which at least one party is located in the EU would come under the purview of the proposed rules. The commission would like to see both derivative contracts and trades in shares and bonds taxed at 0.1 percent from January 2014.

Brussels said that now, when governments are putting the squeeze on public services in order to unwind heavy public debtloads, was the time to introduce such a measure to ensure that the financial sector “makes a fair contribution”.

Public debt in all 27 EU member states jumped from below 60 percent of GDP to 80 percent at the beginning of the crisis, largely as a result of the financial sector receiving €4.6 trillion in assistance from governments.

The commission also said in a statement outlining the proposals that banking world is currently under-taxed by comparison to other sectors.

The aim is also to establish new minimum tax rates and harmonise different existing taxes on financial transactions in the EU, aiming to reduce distortions in the bloc’s single market.

"Our project is sound and workable. I have no doubt this tax can deliver what EU citizens expect; a fair contribution from the financial sector,” said tax commissioner Algirdas Semeta upon the announcement of the proposal.

The move would aim to capture a slice of 85 percent of transactions between financial institutions, but citizens themselves and non-financial-sector businesses would exempt. Mortgages, bank loans, insurance contracts and other financial activities carried out by individuals or small businesses fall outside the scope of the proposal, the commission said.

The plans have strong support from French President and current chair of the G20 Nicolas Sarkozy, who is likely to raise the EU plan at the next meeting of the world’s leading economies in Cannes on 3 November.

Germany, Spain, Finland, Luxembourg, Belgium, Austria, Hungary, Greece and Portugal are also believed to be committed backers of the move at an EU level.

However the UK, home to the City of London financial district, is implacably opposed and has suggested that it will veto the move.

Britain says it is not opposed in principle, but that it must be imposed at a global level, otherwise banks will simply move out of the EU to more amenable tax climates.

"The government will continue to engage with its international partners on financial transaction taxes and has no objection to them in principle,” said the British treasury. “But any financial transaction tax would have to apply globally and there are a number of practical issues that need to be worked through. These issues are underlined by the commission's own analysis."

Oxfam, the anti-poverty organisation that has long campaigned for such a ‘Robin Hood Tax’, welcomed the proposals, but said that the funds must be used not merely to shore up EU budgets, but distributed to “help poor countries facing chilling reductions in aid, trade, and investment.”

Barroso attacks member states, US, banks

In a tub-thumping speech to the European Parliament in Strasbourg, the president of the European Commission has mounted a blistering attack on the leadership of EU member states in the face of what he called the greatest challenge Europe has faced in its history.

EU officials defend health of European banks

EU officials have strongly defended the health of European banks following unexpected criticism by Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund.

EU commission to target growth with new laws in 2012

The European Commission's to-do list for 2012 is dominated by measures to restore economic growth. But the current dispute over a proposed financial transaction tax shows that EU countries might not play ball.

News in Brief

  1. Italy arrests Puigdemont on Spanish warrant
  2. EU and US hold trade talks despite French wrath
  3. EMA to decide on Pfizer vaccine booster in October
  4. EU welcomes Polish TV-station move
  5. Ukrainian parliament passes law to curb power of oligarchs
  6. EU could force Poland to pay lignite-coal fine
  7. Report: EU and US concerned by tech-giants' power
  8. EU states sign 'transparency pledge'

Vietnam jails journalist critical of EU trade deal

A journalist who had demanded the EU postpone its trade deal with Vietnam until human rights improved has been sentenced to 15 years in jail. The EU Commission says it first needs to conduct a detailed analysis before responding.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNATO Secretary General guest at the Session of the Nordic Council
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersCan you love whoever you want in care homes?
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed

Latest News

  1. Activists: 'More deaths' expected on Polish-Belarus border
  2. EU unveils common charger plan - forcing Apple redesign
  3. Central Europe leaders rail against 'new liberal woke virus'
  4. Yemen's refugees in 'appalling conditions', says UN agency
  5. VW emissions software was illegal, top EU lawyer says
  6. Sexism and the selection of the European Parliament president
  7. More French names linked to Russia election-monitoring
  8. Negotiations set for new, tougher, EU ethics body

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us