Monday

19th Feb 2018

Unemployment greatest concern among Europeans, says survey

  • European perceptions of their national economic situations remain very gloomy, says Eurostat. (Photo: xOchoa)

The economic crisis and its social impact is a major concern for most EU citizens, according to a survey published Thursday (20 December) by survey-group Eurobarometer.

“The proportion of Europeans who say that the situation of their national economy is rather bad or very bad exceeds two-thirds for the ninth consecutive time,” notes the survey.

Thank you for reading EUobserver!

Subscribe now for a 30 day free trial.

  1. €150 per year
  2. or €15 per month
  3. Cancel anytime

EUobserver is an independent, not-for-profit news organization that publishes daily news reports, analysis, and investigations from Brussels and the EU member states. We are an indispensable news source for anyone who wants to know what is going on in the EU.

We are mainly funded by advertising and subscription revenues. As advertising revenues are falling fast, we depend on subscription revenues to support our journalism.

For group, corporate or student subscriptions, please contact us. See also our full Terms of Use.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Unemployment, the general unchanged nature of the economic crisis, and rising prices are among the greatest concerns.

In Greece, as well as in Spain, some 95 percent of those surveyed perceive their national economies as "bad".

The unemployment figures in both countries, and in particular among the youth in Spain, has prompted talk of a so-called ‘lost generation’. Those who do find work are more likely to have only part-time jobs or are on temporary contracts.

Others are leaving the country to find opportunities where the job markets are more accommodating.

Both Greece and Spain are enduring intense financial hardship despite efforts by international creditors to prop up their economies and despite EU attempts to stabilise banking systems.

The fear of losing a job or not finding one is pervasive throughout the EU.

More than six Europeans out of 10 believe that "the worst is still to come" when it comes to the impact of the economic crisis on the job market.

It is a view held by the vast majority in Belgium (78%), Greece (78%), and Portugal (79%). In Cyprus, where the national coffer is running dry, the figure almost hits 90 percent.

Citizens in eighteen member states rank unemployment as their number one greatest worry.

The fear of government debt came out on top only in Germany. And immigration figured among the top three concerns only in the United Kingdom.

Most Europeans do not believe the national economy will improve soon.

A large majority of Europeans think the financial and employment situation for next 12 months will remain the same and almost a quarter believe their personnel finances will diminish.

Germany, Sweden and Luxembourg are at the opposite end of the spectrum.

More than two-thirds of the population in all three of these member states say that the situation of their national economies is good.

Opinion

Small businesses: silent sufferers in the economic crisis

The economic crisis is also playing havoc with entrepreneurs and small businesses who face financial ruin when their bills don't get paid. In Hungary, writes the Magdolna Csath, the situation is undermining societal cohesion.

Baltic states demand bigger EU budget

The leaders of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania say in a joint letter that they are open to talks on creating "new own resources" for a bigger EU budget after the UK leaves the EU.

EU-Latin America trade talks move to 'endgame'

Senior negotiators in the EU-Mercosur talks will meet in Brussels on Friday to work out the technical bits of a possible trade deal, after top political officials gave the talks a final push.

News in Brief

  1. Report: Daimler also cheated with diesel
  2. Bulgarian government condemns far-right march in capital
  3. Latvia's central bank chief under arrest
  4. Merkel: Nord Stream 2 pipeline poses 'no danger'
  5. Spanish king in Barcelona next week
  6. Turkey jails journalists for life
  7. Make budget cuts in farm and regional funds, the Dutch say
  8. UN: Hungary's anti-migration bill is 'assault on human rights'

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. UNESDAA year ago UNESDA members pledged to reduce added sugars in soft drinks by 10%
  2. International Partnership for Human RightsUzbekistan: Investigate Torture of Journalist
  3. EPSUMovie Premiere: 'Up to The Last Drop' - 22 February, Brussels
  4. CESICESI@Noon on ‘Digitalisation & Future of Work: Social Protection For All?’ - March 7
  5. UNICEFExecutive Director's Committment to Tackling Sexual Exploitation and Abuse of Children
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region 2018: Facts, Figures and Rankings of the 74 Regions
  7. Mission of China to the EUDigital Economy Shaping China's Future, Over 30% of GDP
  8. Macedonian Human Rights Movement Int.Suing the Governments of Macedonia and Greece for Changing Macedonia's Name
  9. Dialogue PlatformBeyond the Errors in the War on Terror: How to Fight Global Militarism - 22 February
  10. Swedish EnterprisesHarnessing Globalization- at What Cost? Keynote Speaker Commissioner Malmström
  11. European Friends of ArmeniaSave The Date 28/02: “Nagorno-Karabakh & the EU: 1988-2018”
  12. European Heart NetworkSmart CAP is Triple Win for Economy, Environment and Health

Latest News

  1. MPs demand Council become more transparent
  2. Eurogroup starts process to pick new ECB chiefs
  3. 'Fact of life': some EU funding in new tech will get lost
  4. EU asks charities to explain anti-abuse measures
  5. ECB, Budget, EU elections This WEEK
  6. EU states stay mute on implementation of mercury bill
  7. Baltic states demand bigger EU budget
  8. Germany raises concerns over Hungary's 'Stop Soros' bills