Monday

21st Jan 2019

Worst of euro crisis over, says German minister

  • For the German economy, the situation is 'better than expected', says Schaeuble (Photo: World Economic Forum)

Confident that France will "fulfil its obligations" and with Greece off the hook for now, Germany's finance minister Wolfgang Schauble has cast a glimmer of hope for 2013.

"I believe the worst is behind us," Schaeuble told the daily newspaper Bild in an interview previewed on Thursday (27 December).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

Economic projections show most of the eurozone will linger in recession next year, but Germany is likely to keep growing. "The situation is better than expected, also because trade with the US and Asia is picking up," Schaeuble said.

His comments come at the end of three years of intense drama over the survival of the euro during which several red lines were crossed with Greece. It was the first country to receive a bailout and the first to have a partial debt restructuring within the eurozone.

"The government in Athens knows that it cannot financially overburden other eurozone countries. So they are pushing forward with the reforms," Schaeuble said.

Earlier this month, the International Monetary Fund pressured Germany into accepting that Greece will need a further debt cut at the expense of eurozone governments in the coming years, but Schaeuble has managed to postpone such decision until after general elections in Germany next fall.

France falls in line

In his Bild interview, Schaeuble stroke an optimistic tone about France, the second-largest economy in the eurozone where Socialist President Francois Hollande has challenged the German austerity drive and sought to bring the public finances in order by increasing taxes rather than cutting pensions and wages.

"I am certain that France will fulfil its obligations," the German minister said. "The government is very much aware of the fact that every country has to permanently pursue reforms to remain competitive."

The International Monetary Fund on Wednesday repeated concerns about France falling behind Spain and Italy, where market pressure has forced the governments to decrease labour costs and make deeper reforms.

With Spanish exports rebounding, "pressure on France" is further increasing, Edward Gardner, the IMF director in charge of France told journalists in a conference call.

But Gardner also said it would be wrong for Paris to pursue harsh austerity measures in 2013, when growth is expected to be very feeble, even if this meant to slightly miss the EU deficit target of 3 percent of GDP.

This is in line with the IMF's latest change of course about the negative effects of too much austerity in recession-plagued countries like Greece, Spain and Portugal.

"Whether the deficit is 3 or 3.5 percent next year matters less as long as France can give reasonable and credible assurances about the direction of policies," Gardner said, noting that the EU commission has also signalled openness on this front.

As for the tax-hike policy Hollande has pursued, the IMF said there should be no further tax increases but rather spending cuts once the economy is back on a solid growth rate.

"We think that France is hitting a limit where there is very little scope for raising taxes further without dampening initiative and economic activity," Gardner said.

The message seems to have arrived in Paris.

"Over the next five years, there will be more cuts in spending than increases in taxes and that will bring in €60 billion,"French finance minister Pierre Moscovici wrote in the German business daily Handelsblatt.

He also sought to reassure the German public that his government is serious about bringing down the deficit to 3 percent next year and reducing the country's debt.

"In the past 30 years, France has not been able to pass a balanced budget. State debt rose to an unacceptable €1.7 trillion in 2011. It is our duty to reverse this," Moscovici wrote.

ECB unveils new €5 note

The ECB launched a new €5 note on Thursday with a topical joke on the crisis and British euroscepticism.

EU bleeding untold billions to fraud

Over €6bn of EU taxpayers' money was stolen by criminals in recent years and over €130m is still being lost each year, EU auditors said.

ECB takes over ailing Italian bank

Decades of mismanagement appear to have caught up with Italy's Carige bank as the European Central Bank takes control in a move to stave off another banking crisis.

News in Brief

  1. Germany sent 8,658 asylum-seekers to other EU states
  2. Poll: Macron popularity up four percent
  3. 'Economy is broken' says Oxfam in global inequality report
  4. Vestager under pressure to allow Siemens-Alstom deal
  5. Teargas and clashes in Athens over Macedonia name change
  6. EU trade commissioner asks for green light for US talks
  7. Slovakia's commissioner takes unpaid leave to run for presidency
  8. Minority elects Lofven as prime minister of Sweden

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. International Partnership For Human RightsKyrgyz authorities have to immediately release human rights defender Azimjon Askarov
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSeminar on disability and user involvement
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersInternational appetite for Nordic food policies
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Nordic Innovation House in Hong Kong
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Region has chance to become world leader when it comes to start-ups
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersTheresa May: “We will not be turning our backs on the Nordic region”
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsOpen letter to Emmanuel Macron ahead of Uzbek president's visit
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsRaising key human rights concerns during visit of Turkmenistan's foreign minister
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersState of the Nordic Region presented in Brussels
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersThe vital bioeconomy. New issue of “Sustainable Growth the Nordic Way” out now
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic gender effect goes international
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersPaula Lehtomaki from Finland elected as the Council's first female Secretary General

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic design sets the stage at COP24, running a competition for sustainable chairs
  2. Counter BalanceIn Kenya, a motorway funded by the European Investment Bank runs over roadside dwellers
  3. ACCACompany Law Package: Making the Best of Digital and Cross Border Mobility,
  4. International Partnership for Human RightsCivil Society Worried About Shortcomings in EU-Kyrgyzstan Human Rights Dialogue
  5. UNESDAThe European Soft Drinks Industry Supports over 1.7 Million Jobs
  6. Mission of China to the EUJointly Building Belt and Road Initiative Leads to a Better Future for All
  7. International Partnership for Human RightsCivil society asks PACE to appoint Rapporteur to probe issue of political prisoners in Azerbaijan
  8. ACCASocial Mobility – How Can We Increase Opportunities Through Training and Education?
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersEnergy Solutions for a Greener Tomorrow
  10. UNICEFWhat Kind of Europe Do Children Want? Unicef & Eurochild Launch Survey on the Europe Kids Want
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Countries Take a Stand for Climate-Smart Energy Solutions
  12. Mission of China to the EUChina: Work Together for a Better Globalisation

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us