Monday

14th Jun 2021

Cyprus demands revision of 'unjust' EU bailout

  • Anastasiades, who personally agreed the 'unjust' deal, speaking to media in Brussels (Photo: consilium.europa.eu)

Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiades has demanded a complete revision of his country's €10 billion bailout, which imposed unprecedented cuts on large depositors. But it is unlikely his request will be approved by eurozone ministers.

In a leaked letter sent last week to eurozone leaders, Anastasiades said his country was treated unjustly for fear its problems may spread to the barely-stable Greece, the Financial Times and AFP report.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

"Artificial measures such as capital restrictions may seem to prevent a bank run in the short term but will only aggravate the depositors the longer they persist," he wrote.

"Rather than creating confidence in the banking system they are eroding it by the day," he added.

He also criticised the way the two largest banks - Bank of Cyprus and Laiki - were forced to impose losses on their largest depositors.

"No distinction was made between long-term deposits earning high returns and money flowing through current accounts, such as firms' working capital," he said.

"This amounted to a significant loss of working capital for businesses," he noted.

With recession deepening to a projected 12.5 percent in the next two years and with unemployment on the rise, Anastasiades asked fellow EU leaders to "review the possibilities in order to determine a viable prospect for Cyprus and its people."

The centre-right president, only four months in the job, himself agreed to the terms of the bailout after weeks of negotiations which at one point would have imposed losses on all depositors, big and small. Under EU rules, deposits below €100,000 should be protected.

His letter is likely to be discussed on Thursday at a meeting of eurozone finance ministers, but chances are slim that any changes are made to his country's bailout, as any extra money or more time to repay it would be dismissed by Germany ahead of general elections in September.

Meanwhile, the Cypriot government has announced it will sell casino licences and build a natural gas storage facility in a bid to restart its troubled economy.

Its model was so far was based on no-questions-asked offshore banking and low tax, attracting money from places like Russia and Ukraine.

As part of the bailout deal, Cyprus has put part of its gold reserves on sale and boosted its corporate tax to 12.5 percent.

It is also closing down Laiki and deeply restructuring the Bank of Cyprus, the country's largest lender.

Meanwhile, capital controls, put in place in March to prevent a massive flight of money from the island, are still partly in place and continue to cause difficulties for Cypriot businesses.

News in Brief

  1. Swiss voters reject climate change measures
  2. Spain: Thousands protest against Catalan leaders' pardon
  3. Belarus opposition leader says 'harsh' sanctions needed
  4. Far-right ex-settler becomes Israeli prime minister
  5. EU top court fast-tracks rule-of-law case to October
  6. Hungary's Fidesz wants to ban LGBTIQ content for under-18s
  7. MEPs join EU citizens on farm-animal cage ban
  8. Council of Europe urges Russia to release Navalny 'immediately'

Vietnam jails journalist critical of EU trade deal

A journalist who had demanded the EU postpone its trade deal with Vietnam until human rights improved has been sentenced to 15 years in jail. The EU Commission says it first needs to conduct a detailed analysis before responding.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNineteen demands by Nordic young people to save biodiversity
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersSustainable public procurement is an effective way to achieve global goals
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Council enters into formal relations with European Parliament
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersWomen more active in violent extremist circles than first assumed
  5. Nordic Council of MinistersDigitalisation can help us pick up the green pace
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersCOVID19 is a wake-up call in the fight against antibiotic resistance

Latest News

  1. Brexit grumbles overshadow UK summit
  2. Former French PM to work for Russian oil firm
  3. Lobbyists push to greenwash EU rules for renewable hydrogen
  4. UN report on pushbacks draws cautious EU response
  5. Biden in Brussels, recovery package underway This WEEK
  6. Nato's biggest enemy hides within
  7. The Dutch politician suing the Dutch state for ethnic-profiling
  8. EU urges Poland to step back from 'legal primacy' clash

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us