Thursday

27th Apr 2017

US prevents G7 energy statement

  • Perry had reportedly wanted G7 conclusions to refer to coal and other fossil fuels (Photo: Gage Skidmore)

A meeting between energy ministers of the Group of Seven (G7) and the EU ended on Monday (10 April) without a joint statement, as the United States did not want to endorse a text that referred to the Paris climate agreement and the clean energy transition.

Italian energy minister Carlo Calenda told a news conference that there would be no joint statement, Italian media reported on Monday.

A source close to the meeting confirmed US secretary of energy Rick Perry had informed his counterparts that the US was “reviewing” its climate and energy policies and therefore could not sign a joint declaration that referred to the treaty signed in Paris in 2015.

Perry reportedly had wanted the text to refer to coal and other fossil fuels. Last month, US president Donald Trump rolled back an Obama-era policy, the clean power plan, in an effort to bring back American jobs related to coal mining. Coal is the most polluting fossil fuel.

The Paris treaty is the first global agreement on curbing greenhouse gas emissions, in attempt to avert the most catastrophic consequence of climate change, but Trump has sent conflicting messages about whether the US would uphold its promises made in Paris.

On Sunday and Monday, Italy's Calenda hosted his colleagues from Canada, France, Germany, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. Climate action EU commissioner Miguel Arias Canete also attended, on behalf of the European Union.

In a written statement, commissioner Canete did not publicly criticise Perry, but did indirectly note his obstruction.

“While secretary Perry informed us that the US is currently reviewing its energy and climate policies, I was particularly pleased to see that all others joined the EU in reaffirming our solid commitment and determination to implement the Paris Agreement and continue the clean energy transition,” said Canete.

EU doing well in global energy ranking

The majority of countries in the top-20 of the Global Energy Architecture Performance Index are members of the European Union, with Switzerland leading the list.

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