Tuesday

19th Mar 2019

Centre-right: Socialists cannot get three top posts

  • Merkel offered Cameron a small sweetener (Photo: epp.eu)

Centre-right leaders and MEPs said on Thursday (26 June) the Socialists cannot get three EU top posts, while indicating a preference for the EU Council job.

Outgoing Dutch MEP Corien Wortmann-Kool, who took part in the EPP meeting in Kortrijk, south-west Belgium, told EUobserver afterward: “Reflecting the outcome of the EU elections means it would be clearly too much for Socialists to claim both the high representative [for foreign affairs] and the EU Council presidency, as well as the European Parliament top post.”

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 18 year's of archives. 30 days free trial.

... or join as a group

She said the centre-right EPP bloc could live with the foreign affairs post staying in the Socialist family, but that the EU Council presidency should rather go to someone from the centre-right.

With EPP member Jean-Claude Juncker set to take over the EU Commission presidency after a vote among EU leaders on Friday, the Socialist European Parliament chief, Martin Schulz, has arranged to stay on for another 2.5 years.

Meanwhile, Italy's Socialist prime minister Matteo Renzi is pushing for his foreign minister, Federica Mogherini, to succeed Catherine Ashton as foreign affairs czar.

Denmark's Socialist prime minister, Helle Thorning-Schmidt, is also considered as a possible successor to EU Council chairman Herman Van Rompuy or Ashton.

The EU Council and foreign relations posts are likely to be decided at a dinner in Brussels on 16 July.

Thorning-Schmidt has said she wants to stay on as prime minister at home.

But her counterpart from Finland, Alexander Stubb, an EPP member, said in Kortrijk that he would vote for her "for any top job".

"She was an MEP and a graduate from the College of Europe in Bruges, she would be good for any job”.

Small sweetener

With British PM David Cameron still opposed to Juncker’s appointment, German Chancellor Angela Merkel and the Finnish and Swedish leaders offered him a small sweetener in the form of UK-friendly tweaks to the EU’s official priorities for the next few years.

"I think we can find good compromises with the UK, we can take a step towards them," Merkel said.

Wortmann-Kool noted that the discussion remained vague and that there was "no real willingness to change all our agenda" just because Cameron is losing a vote on Juncker.

The draft priorities already contain points which coincide with British demands: cutting red tape; a commitment to sign more free trade agreements; and limiting EU action to major issues, instead of small initiatives which could be handled at national level.

Cameron told the BBC before a WWI commemoration ceremony in Ypres, Belgium, the same day that leaders are ceding too much power to the EU level.

"My message to my fellow heads of government and heads of state, is that this approach that they are contemplating taking, is the wrong approach for Europe. They are giving up the right of heads of state and heads of government to choose the head of the European Commission. That is a mistake," he said.

Magazine

The changing of the guards in the EU in 2019

The four most powerful EU institutions - Commission, Parliament, Council and Central Bank will all have new leaders in the coming ten months. Here is an overview.

Feature

The shadowy EU parliament boss who likes to say 'no'

Despite 10 years in the job, Klaus Welle is the most powerful man in Brussels few have heard of. The Parliament secretary-general has granted EUobserver access to just one paper written by him - and refused 21 other requests.

News in Brief

  1. Blow for May as third vote on Brexit deal ruled out
  2. Three killed in possible 'terror' gun attack in Utrecht
  3. Third Brexit vote this week only if DUP will support it
  4. Germany's two largest banks confirm merger talks
  5. Serbian pro-democracy protests reach 15th week
  6. 'Yellow Vest' riots leave Paris shops vandalised
  7. European woman older when having first baby
  8. Majority of Germans want Merkel to stay on

Magazine

The changing of the guards in the EU in 2019

The four most powerful EU institutions - Commission, Parliament, Council and Central Bank will all have new leaders in the coming ten months. Here is an overview.

Magazine

All about the European Parliament elections 2019

EUobserver's new magazine is meant to help readers prepare for the European Parliament elections, no matter their level of knowledge. You can download and read the entire magazine now.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersNew Secretary General: Nordic co-operation must benefit everybody
  2. Platform for Peace and JusticeMEP Kati Piri: “Our red line on Turkey has been crossed”
  3. UNICEF2018 deadliest year yet for children in Syria as war enters 9th year
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic commitment to driving global gender equality
  5. International Partnership for Human RightsMeet your defender: Rasul Jafarov leading human rights defender from Azerbaijan
  6. UNICEFUNICEF Hosts MEPs in Jordan Ahead of Brussels Conference on the Future of Syria
  7. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic talks on parental leave at the UN
  8. International Partnership for Human RightsTrial of Chechen prisoner of conscience and human rights activist Oyub Titiev continues.
  9. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic food policy inspires India to be a sustainable superpower
  10. Nordic Council of MinistersMilestone for Nordic-Baltic e-ID
  11. Counter BalanceEU bank urged to free itself from fossil fuels and take climate leadership
  12. Intercultural Dialogue PlatformRoundtable: Muslim Heresy and the Politics of Human Rights, Dr. Matthew J. Nelson

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us