Friday

24th Feb 2017

Focus

Public disclosure unkind to Swedish nationalists

  • Swedish parties are becoming more transparent (Photo: Peter Gibson)

The presence of a populist, nationalist party in their midst has belatedly convinced Swedish political parties to legislate for compulsory disclosure of party contributions.

From 1 April this year, all political parties will need to publically declare any donations of over €2,000. And any anonymous donations will exclude the party in question from public financing.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

The only party to vote against the reform was the Swedish Democrats (SD), the nationalist party whose presence triggered the sudden zeal to find out where everybody is getting their funding from.

The Swedish Democrats were newcomers in the Swedish Parliament in 2010 and have almost doubled the support they had in the elections from around 5 percent to just over 10 percent.

Lately, however, the numbers seem to be going the wrong way for the party. A February poll showed support for the SD had dropped to 8.7 percent.

This could be because the SD Party secretary Bjorn Soder highlighted the fact that there is a loophole in the legislation that he is interested in exploiting. Only anonymous donations to the national organisation fall under the scope of the legislation. Donations to local entities are technically still allowed.

Or it may have been the appearance of the SD leader, Jimmi Akesson, on a recent TV political show.

Akesson told the audience about growing up in a small town that was suddenly flooded with immigrants. He spoke of not being listened to when he wanted to discuss the problems he felt this caused.

Unfortunately for Akesson, the very next day old school friends of his popped up to say there was no immigration to speak of when they were growing up.

A check of the statistics confirmed their account. The flood arriving in Akesson’s hometown in his youth consisted of one hundred non-Swedes in a population of 7,000.

EUobserved

When two worlds collide

Two worlds collided at the end of last week. The shrill, uncompromising one of British politics and the technocratic, dry, world of the European Commission.

EUobserved

Schadenfreude and fire-walking in the EP

There was outright glee in the EP on Thursday. It was time to dust off everyone’s favourite German word for pleasure in the misfortune of others.

EU parliament approves Juncker commission

MEPs have approved Juncker's new EU commission, with a slightly smaller majority than in 2010, and following a number of concessions on portfolios.

News in Brief

  1. Spanish court jails former IMF chief Rato
  2. Macron proposes Nordic-style economic model for France
  3. Germany posts record high budget surplus
  4. Labour ousts Ukip in Brexit homeland
  5. Dutch lower house approves EU-Ukraine treaty
  6. WTO says Russian pork ban was illegal
  7. Belgian nuclear plant made 'significant progress' on safety
  8. Report: Commission gauging EU support for Poland sanctions

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EURORDISJoin the Rare Disease Day and Help to Advocate for More Research on Rare Diseases
  2. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceStudents Who Are Considered Fit Get Better Grades in School
  3. QS World MBA TourMeet with Leading International Business Schools in Paris on March 4th
  4. Malta EU 2017Economic Governance: Agreement Reached on Structural Reform Support Programme for Member States
  5. Socialists & DemocratsWomen Have to Work Ten Years Longer to Match Lifetime Earnings of Men
  6. Counter BalanceTrans-Adriatic Pipeline Is a Major Risk for Banks, Warns New Analysis
  7. Martens CentreEU and US Migration Policies Compared: Join the Debate on February 28th
  8. Swedish EnterprisesTechnology and Data Flows - Shaping the Society of Tomorrow
  9. UNICEFNearly 1.4 Million Children at Risk of Death as Famine Looms Across Africa and Yemen
  10. Malta EU 2017End of Roaming Fees: Council Reaches Agreement on Wholesale Caps
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Innovation House Opens in New York to Help Startups Access US Market
  12. Centre Maurits CoppietersMinorities and Migrations