Wednesday

7th Dec 2022

MEPs back cross-border enforcement of driving fines

  • Speeding tickets could soon chase you across the border in the EU (Photo: EUobserver)

The European Parliament transport committee gave on Tuesday (9 September) its green light to a law aimed at identifying and fining drivers, who committ an offence in another EU state.

A total of 49 parliamentarians voted in favour of the plan to deliver more effective cross-border enforcement of penalties. No one voted against, while one MEP abstained.

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Become an expert on Europe

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 years of archives. 14-day free trial.

... or subscribe as a group

According to Spanish Socialist Inez Ayala Sender, stirring the dossier in the European Parliament, the main goal is to put an end to unequal treatment of foreign and local drivers when they have committed similar offences.

The draft legislation's cornerstone is "an electronic data exchange network", which would see EU states swiftly identify the holder of a vehicle registration document and exchange the necessary data linked to traffic offences.

In practice, once an offence is committed, where the vehicle is registered would be identified and the relevant national authority would then send notification of an offence to the owner of the vehicle, requesting payment of the fine.

At this stage, four types of offences - speeding, drink-driving, non-use of a seatbelt and failing to stop at a red traffic light - fall under the scope of the draft law, as they are responsible for 75 percent of road deaths.

But eventually, the European Commission and MEPs are to look into the possibility of extending the law to cover other traffic infringements such as driving under the influence of drugs, using mobile phones while driving and uninsured driving.

The changes are expected to contribute to the EU's overall ambition of reducing the number of people killed on European roads by 50 percent by 2010 - something that the European Commission itself sees as unlikely to be achieved.

In addition, MEPs backed the idea of intensive checks on the roads.

The number of speed controls should be increased by 30 percent in those countries where the fatality rate stands above the EU average, believe euro-deputies. At least 30 percent of all drivers should annually be tested for drinking amounts higher than the legal limit.

Furthermore, the parliamentarians also want checks on wearing a seat belt carried out for at least six weeks a year in countries where non-compliance is high.

ECB says more rate hikes to come

European Central Bank president Christine Lagarde said more rate hikes will come, but also admitted a recession will not lower inflation — leaving some economist question the logic of the policy.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersLarge Nordic youth delegation at COP15 biodiversity summit in Montreal
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersCOP27: Food systems transformation for climate action
  3. Nordic Council of MinistersThe Nordic Region and the African Union urge the COP27 to talk about gender equality
  4. International Sustainable Finance CentreJoin CEE Sustainable Finance Summit, 15 – 19 May 2023, high-level event for finance & business
  5. Friedrich Naumann Foundation European DialogueGender x Geopolitics: Shaping an Inclusive Foreign Security Policy for Europe
  6. Obama FoundationThe Obama Foundation Opens Applications for its Leaders Program in Europe

Latest News

  1. EU delays Hungary funds decision, as Budapest vetoes Ukraine aid
  2. Borrell gets pension from MEP fund set for taxpayer bailout
  3. Autocrats make us all less secure
  4. Big Agri's lies: green EU farming not to blame for food insecurity
  5. German top court declares €800bn EU recovery fund 'legal'
  6. EU countries struggle to crack Hungary's vetos
  7. Frontex expanding migrant route-busting mission in Balkans
  8. EU ministers in fresh battle on joint debt, after Biden subsidies

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us