Monday

1st May 2017

Focus

Van Rompuy: Europeans too depressed to be innovative

  • A first assessment of innovation policies and country-specific recommendations will be made at the EU summit in June (Photo: Valentina Pop)

If Europe is to remain relevant as an innovative economy, people need to be more positive and entrepreneurial and not let themselves be depressed by the economic crisis and subsequent austerity measures, EU council chairman Herman Van Rompuy has said.

"Innovation has a lot to do with behaviour, risk taking, motivation and education. You can't have a society of very creative people only based on financial stimulus," the former Belgian premier said Wednesday (4 May) during a conference organised by Ernst&Young on innovation and the role of government in supporting it.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Van Rompuy said that "societal problems in Belgium and elsewhere" in the EU mean that people "live in a climate of despair and are depressed."

But in order for Europe to remain at the cutting edge of innovation in areas ranging from energy to agriculture, services and digital technologies, "we need a dynamic and positive society," based on competition "but also on generosity."

The financial and subsequent economic crises "can help," he said, noting that in the past year, EU institutions have evolved a lot.

"But crisis can be very depressive. Only negative messages from leaders are the wrong message coming out of the crisis. The positive outlook is key for a dynamic society," he stressed.

Noting that according to the EU's own estimates, the bloc will fall behind Asia and the US by 2025 in terms of innovation, Van Rompuy said he will not let EU leaders hide behind nice pledges, after they agreed earlier this year to give priority to areas such as education, innovation and energy.

"We will not allow this process to become a slow bureaucratic exercise, but we will follow it closely," he said.

At an upcoming EU summit mid-June, a first assessment of these policies and country-specific recommendations will be made.

"Early 2012, I want to know what member states concretely did in the one year period to boost innovation, even in harsh times of austerity. What did they do to increase the share of innovative products and services in public procurement, to stimulate green growth, to prove the use of EU funding allocated to research and innovation," Van Rompuy said.

His remarks on lack of innovation in Belgium was echoed by the CEO of the country's national railway company (NMBS), Marc Descheemaecker.

In a video interview for the EUobserver, Descheemaecker said: "Innovation is very important for us, because although we are a classical industry – transport industry – we have to do more – move more people and goods – with fewer means."

"In Belgium we need incentives, partnerships with the government, in order to develop an innovative platform. We have to be more entrepreneurial, we need more new businesses starting up, we need young, fresh, creative people starting up their own businesses – that's a bit lagging behind at this point in time," Descheemaecker said.

When asked why, the CEO said because Belgium has a high standard of living and comfort.

"Need also drives creation. If you are too comfortable, well installed in your sofa, you don't feel the urge to go and start creating, start innovating things," he noted.

His view of the government being an important driver of innovation was however contradicted by Geert Noels, a leading Belgian economist and author of "Econoshocks."

"If innovation would depend on public stimulus and subsidies, it wouldn't be called innovation. It wouldn't be change, because change comes from the people, not from the government," he told this website.

In Noels' view, Belgium has to create an environment "in which people are open to change, and educated to manage that change. But I am a disbeliever that you can subsidise innovation."

Key note speaker Herman Van Rompuy at the Ernst & Young Innovation conference

EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS (4 MAY 2011) How can Europe be more innovative? At the first ever Government and Innovation Summit in Brussels on 4 May organised by Ernst & Young, the President of the EU council Herman Van Rompuy offered his views. A survey conducted by CEPS revealed that the EU is putting enough money towards R&D projects, but that this money could be better spent. Innovation expert Charles Leadbeater explained what Europe really needs to boost innovation.

Watch more EUobserver videos here

Watch webcast: here

Innovation

As the EU continues to struggle with the effects of the economic crisis, the importance of investing in innovation and research is increasingly been emphasized. But how much money is enough and where should it be spent? EUobserver investigates.

EU innovation efforts unknown

The efforts of the EU to turn the old continent into an “innovation union” are largely unknown to business leaders, according to a survey by global accounting firm Ernst & Young.

The Acta debate - will innovation be stifled?

Opponents of Acta, the controversial anti-counterfeiting treaty up for vote in the European Parliament in July, say, among other things, that it would stifle innovation. Advocates say the exact opposite.

News in Brief

  1. Vote of no confidence prepared against Spanish PM
  2. Syria to buy Russian anti-missile system
  3. Germany seeks partial burka ban
  4. Libya has no plan to stop migration flows
  5. EU has no evidence of NGO-smuggler collusion in Libya
  6. Poland gets 'final warning' on logging in ancient forest
  7. Commission gives Italy final warning on air pollution
  8. Romania and Slovenia taken to court over environment policies

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. European Healthy Lifestyle AllianceCharlotte Hornets' Nicolas Batum Tells Kids to "Eat Well, Drink Well, Move!"
  2. ECR GroupSyed Kamall: We Need a New, More Honest Relationship With Turkey
  3. Counter BalanceParliament Sends Strong Signal to the EIB: Time to Act on Climate Change
  4. ACCARisks and Opportunities of Blockchain and Shared Ledgers Technologies in Financial Services
  5. UNICEFRace Against Time to Save Millions of Lives in Yemen
  6. Nordic Council of MinistersDeveloping Independent Russian-Language Media in the Baltic Countries
  7. Swedish EnterprisesReform of the European Electricity Market: Lessons from the Nordics, Brussels 2 May
  8. Malta EU 2017Green Light Given for New EU Regulation to Bolster External Border Checks
  9. Counter BalanceCall for EU Commission to Withdraw Support of Trans-Adriatic Pipeline
  10. ACCAEconomic Confidence at Highest Since 2015
  11. European Federation of Allergy and Airways60%-90% of Your Life Is Spent Indoors. How Does Poor Indoor Air Quality Affect You?
  12. European Gaming and Betting AssociationCJEU Confirms Obligation for a Transparent Licensing Process

Latest News

  1. EU boasts unity on Brexit talks
  2. May’s election juggernaut
  3. EPP scolds Orban over university and NGO laws
  4. Oxford-Studie besorgt über 'Schrott' News in Frankreich
  5. Alte Freundschaft zwischen Le Pen und Putin
  6. EP chief faces questions after homophobic 'summit'
  7. EU signals Northern Ireland could join if united with Ireland
  8. One year later: EU right to open internet still virtual