Tuesday

27th Sep 2016

MEPs boost transparency in committee votes

  • Casini: 'Voters have a right to know how their elected representatives have voted' (Photo: European Parliament)

A large majority of MEPs on Wednesday (26 February) in Strasbourg agreed to increase transparency in the committee level decision-making process.

With more and more critical votes on draft laws taken at the committee stage, the change means final legislative votes in committees will be electronically recorded and published for public scrutiny in a so-called roll call vote.

Dear EUobserver reader

Subscribe now for unrestricted access to EUobserver.

Sign up for 30 days' free trial, no obligation. Full subscription only 15 € / month or 150 € / year.

  1. Unlimited access on desktop and mobile
  2. All premium articles, analysis, commentary and investigations
  3. EUobserver archives

EUobserver is the only independent news media covering EU affairs in Brussels and all 28 member states.

♡ We value your support.

If you already have an account click here to login.

Most final committee votes are currently taken by a show of hands. But a roll call vote means people can now hold an MEP accountable for his or her voting behaviour at all stages of the law-making process.

“The rather lengthy distance between the European Parliament and the citizen should not be shrouded in opacity,” said UK liberal Andrew Duff in a statement.

“While all votes in committee are open to the press and public, it is very difficult for the voting behaviour of every individual MEP to be monitored,” he added.

Italian centre-right MEP Carlo Casini, who chairs the parliament’s constitutional affairs committee, was the lead negotiator on the file.

Casini in his report justified the change because “voters have a right to know how their elected representatives have voted.”

His report met initial resistance by the parliament’s centre-right EPP and the centre-left S&D groups.

Both groups delayed placing the item on the assembly agenda twice.

They wanted further consultations and argued that MEPs must understand the full implications of the roll call because it narrows the room for manoeuvre and flexibility in negotiations.

Exposing voting track records is said to make it more difficult for deputies to engage in legislative swaps, a process where an MEP or a group of MEPs make concessions to the opposing camp on a proposal in exchange for something else.

Pro-transparency groups say the procedural change is needed because the real decision-making on legislation in the parliament is often made at the committee levels.

Column / Brexit Briefing

Brexit: preparing for a bitter divorce

Conservatives Brexiteers and Labour leadership are increasingly leaning away from the Norwegian-style deal with the EU, towards a UK-specific arrangement.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. EFAMessages of Hope From the Basque Country and Galicia
  2. Access NowDigital Rights Heroes and Villains. See Who Protects Your Rights, Who Wants to Take Them Away
  3. Martens CentreQuo Vadis Georgia? What to Expect From the Parliamentary Elections. Debate on 29 September
  4. EJCAppalled by Recommendation to Remove Hamas From EU Terrorism Watch List
  5. GoogleBringing Education to Refugees in Lebanon With the Clooney Foundation for Justice
  6. HuaweiAn Industry-leading ICT Solution Provider and Building a Better World
  7. World VisionUN Refugees Meeting a Wasted Opportunity to Improve the Lives of Millions of Children
  8. Belgrade Security ForumCan Democracy Survive Global Disorder?
  9. YouthProAktivEntrepreneurship, Proactivity, Innovation - Turn Ideas Into Action #IPS2016
  10. GoogleTrimming the Waste-Line: Weaving Circular Economy Principles Into Our Operations
  11. Crowdsourcing Week EuropeDon't Miss the Mega Conference to Master Crowdsourcing, Crowdfunding and Innovation! 10% Discount Code CSWEU16
  12. ACCAKaras Report on Access to Finance for SMEs in a Capital Markets Union