Wednesday

20th Nov 2019

Romanian PM wades into '€20m fine for journalists' row

  • Romania's PM Viorica Dancila says her country's constitution guarantees press freedoms (Photo: European Commission)

Romania's prime minister Viorica Dancila has weighed in on a threat by her country's authorities to impose a €20m fine on investigative reporters for alleged data violations - by telling this website privacy violations must be sanctioned.

"If these rights are not observed, if there is transgressions on confidentiality and private life, these things need to be sanctioned according to European rules," she said on Wednesday (5 December).

Read and decide

Join EUobserver today

Support quality EU news

Get instant access to all articles — and 20 year's of archives. 30-day free trial.

... or join as a group

The premier's comments follow threats last month by Romania's data protection chief to impose a €20m fine on the Rise Project, composed of investigative reporters digging into high-level political corruption in a case known as the #TeleormanLeaks.

Dancila also said Romania's constitution guarantees the freedom of expression and opinion for journalists - but then drew a distinction with the European data protection regulation, the GDPR.

"This [freedom of expression] is guaranteed and every journalist enjoys it but at the same time, we do have a European regulation on data protection," she said.

The #TeleormanLeaks investigation involves Tel Drum, a road construction company based in Romania's Teleorman county. The firm is under a fraud investigation over EU funds, and has been linked to Liviu Dragnea, the president of Romania's Social Democratic Party.

The Rise Project had published photos and names on Facebook that reveal a close relationship between Dragnea and Tel Drum executives.

However, Romania's data protection authority now wants the reporters to reveal their sources, under the EU's recent GDPR legislation, claiming the Facebook post may have violated the privacy rights of those implicated in the affair.

The authority cited the GDPR as its basis to subpoena the reporters, prompting a sharp rebuke from both the European Commission and civil society.

The European Data Protection Board (EDPB), charged with overseeing GDPR compliance, was set to discuss the matter on Wednesday (5 December) but has since postponed the issue until January.

"There was no time today to discuss a reply on behalf of the chair [Andrea Jelinek]. This topic has been postponed until the January plenary," said an EDPB spokesperson.

Some dozen civil society groups, including Reporters without Borders and Privacy International, in mid-November demanded Jelinek consider whether the request made by Romania's data chief complies with GDPR and the European charter of fundamental rights.

That response is now also set for January.

In October, Jelinek told this website that politicians using data protection to stop reporters probing how public money is spent is a poor excuse.

"To say or to pretend it is a data protection issue and so you can't investigative, it is just an easy way to keep questions away for those who don't want to answer," she said, speaking in a personal capacity.

Those comments were made before Romania's data protection chief threatened to fine the Rise Project.

Romania 'using EU data protection law to silence journalists'

An award-winning journalism outlet in Romania is being threatened with fines by the country's data protection authorities - for having disclosed connections, on Facebook, of powerful politicians and a firm embroiled in scandal.

EU warns Romania not to abuse GDPR against press

Romania's data protection authority has threatened a €20m fine against reporters investigating high-level corruption. The European Commission has since issued a warning, telling Romanian authorities to give press exemptions when it comes to privacy rights.

Focus

Are EU data watchdogs staffed for GDPR?

The success of the new general data protection regulation (GDPR) will depend on whether data protection authorities enforce the new rules - which, in turn, will be at least partly determined by how many people they employ.

New 'EU presidents' strangling free press

Romania's press freedom is "in free fall" as it takes over its EU presidency, Reporters Without Borders has warned, amid wider EU concern on judicial meddling and corruption.

Romania mired in corruption woes as presidency begins

With the country's de facto leader filing a lawsuit at the EU's top court over report accusing him of corruption, and concerns of the country's rule of law, Romania's EU presidency kicked off in Bucharest to a rocky start.

Stalling on VAT reform costing billions, says Commission

German media outlet Correctiv, along with other newsrooms, have revealed how criminals annually cheat EU states out of billions in VAT fraud. The EU Commission says solutions exist - but member states refuse to budge on tax unanimity.

Stakeholders' Highlights

  1. Nordic Council of MinistersEarmarked paternity leave – an effective way to change norms
  2. Nordic Council of MinistersNordic Climate Action Weeks in December
  3. UNESDAUNESDA welcomes Nicholas Hodac as new Director General
  4. Nordic Council of MinistersBrussels welcomes Nordic culture
  5. UNESDAUNESDA appoints Nicholas Hodac as Director General
  6. UNESDASoft drinks industry co-signs Circular Plastics Alliance Declaration
  7. FEANIEngineers Europe Advisory Group: Building the engineers of the future
  8. Nordic Council of MinistersNew programme studies infectious diseases and antibiotic resistance
  9. UNESDAUNESDA reduces added sugars 11.9% between 2015-2017
  10. International Partnership for Human RightsEU-Uzbekistan Human Rights Dialogue: EU to raise key fundamental rights issues
  11. Nordic Council of MinistersNo evidence that social media are harmful to young people
  12. Nordic Council of MinistersCanada to host the joint Nordic cultural initiative 2021

Join EUobserver

Support quality EU news

Join us